Targeted Radionuclide Treatment for Neuroendocrine Tumors Improves Quality of Life

Excerpt:

“Malignant neuroendocrine tumors, commonly called NETs, are easy to miss and associated with discouraging survival rates and poor quality of life. A study presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) shows how a novel peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is significantly improving patient wellbeing.

“In the NETTER-1 Phase III Trial, a randomized prospective study, researchers focused on advanced midgut NETs and reviewed patient-reported quality of life questionnaires following treatment with lutetium-177 (177Lu)-octreotate PRRT, also known as 177Lu-DOTATATE—brand name Lutathera. Treatment with Lutathera provided some relief for neuroendocrine cancer patients in the study when compared to high-dose octreotide, used as a control.”

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Personalized PRRT Improves Radiation Delivery to Neuroendocrine Tumors

Excerpt:

“Neuroendocrine cancer is exceedingly difficult to manage and unlikely to be cured, but researchers intend to slow progression of these tumors and aid survival by personalizing patient dose of peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), according to research presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI).

“PRRT has become a of choice for relatively rare and easy-to-overlook neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The targeted treatment is designed to home in on and attach to peptide-receptor positive tumors, while sparing tissues that might otherwise be damaged by systemic treatments. However, researchers are still perfecting the practice.”

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Expert Discusses Progress in Neuroendocrine Tumors

Excerpt:

“Treatment advances for patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are bringing hope to a therapeutic landscape that has seen little activity until recent years, says Jonathan Strosberg, MD.

“In an interview with OncLive, Strosberg, medical oncologist, Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, section head, Neuroendocrine Division, chair, Gastrointestinal Department Research Program, Moffitt Cancer Center, discussed recent developments and emerging agents in the field of NETs.”

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Which Patients Will Be Helped By Immune Cancer Drugs? This Test May Tell

Excerpt:

“You’ve probably heard about powerful new cancer medicines like Keytruda and Opdivo. As advertised on TV, these drugs release brakes on the immune system to make tumors disappear and extend survival in deadly diseases like lung cancer and melanoma. But these agents, called checkpoint inhibitors, work in only a fraction of patients. Scientists are searching for diagnostic tests to predict who will be helped, and who won’t.

“A promising solution comes from Foundation Medicine, a molecular diagnostics company headquartered in Cambridge, Mass. Foundation offers a cancer genome profiling test that evaluates mutations in DNA. With results from its standard FoundationOne panel, Foundation calculates a Tumor Mutation Burden (TMB) score. This quantitative readout―based on the number and type of DNA changes per megabase, a length of DNA―may prove helpful to patients considering immune treatment for many advanced forms of cancer.”

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New Study Finds That Most Cancer Mutations Are Due to Random DNA Copying ‘Mistakes’

Excerpt:

“Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists report data from a new study providing evidence that random, unpredictable DNA copying ‘mistakes’ account for nearly two-thirds of the mutations that cause cancer. Their research is grounded on a novel mathematical model based on DNA sequencing and epidemiologic data from around the world.

” ‘It is well-known that we must avoid environmental factors such as smoking to decrease our risk of getting . But it is not as well-known that each time a normal cell divides and copies its DNA to produce two new cells, it makes multiple mistakes,’ says Cristian Tomasetti, Ph.D., assistant professor of biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. ‘These copying mistakes are a potent source of cancer that historically have been scientifically undervalued, and this new work provides the first estimate of the fraction of mutations caused by these mistakes.’ ”

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Chi-Med Presented Sulfatinib Neuroendocrine Tumors Phase Ib/II Results at the 14th Annual Conference of European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society

Excerpt:

“Hutchison China MediTech Limited (“Chi-Med”) (AIM/Nasdaq: HCM) presented data from the ongoing Phase Ib/II clinical trial of sulfatinib in patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors (“NET”) at the 14th Annual Conference of European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (“ENETS”), held in Barcelona, Spain from March 8 to 10, 2017. Sulfatinib is an oral, novel angio-immunokinase inhibitor that selectively targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (“VEGFR”), fibroblast growth factor receptor (“FGFR”) and colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (“CSF-1R”), three key tyrosine kinase receptors involved in tumor angiogenesis and immune evasion. Five other sulfatinib clinical trials are underway in China and the US, including two Phase III studies in NET patients (SANET-p and SANET-ep), one Phase II study in thyroid cancer patients and one Phase II study in biliary tract cancer patients.”

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FDA Approves Xermelo for Carcinoid Syndrome Diarrhea in Patients with Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

Excerpt:

“The FDA approved telotristat ethyl tablets for use in combination with somatostatin analog therapy for the treatment of adults with carcinoid syndrome diarrhea.

“The approval is intended for patients with carcinoid syndrome — a rare and debilitating condition that affects people with carcinoid tumors and metastatic neuroendocrine tumors — that somatostatin analog therapy alone inadequately controlled. Carcinoid syndrome occurs in less than 10% of patients with carcinoid tumors. The tumors cause the excess release of the hormone serotonin, resulting in diarrhea, which in turn can lead to weight loss, malnutrition, dehydration and electrolyte imbalance.”

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Cabozantinib Elicits Responses in Neuroendocrine and Carcinoid Tumors

Excerpt:

“In a phase II study reported at the 2017 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor cabozantinib (Cometriq) was evaluated in advanced carcinoid and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Radiographic responses to therapy were observed in both tumor subtypes, and compared to other drugs historically used in this setting, progression-free survival data were encouraging, according to Jennifer A. Chan, MD, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston.

“Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway inhibitors have shown activity in advanced neuroendocrine tumors. Recent studies have suggested that activation of the MET signaling pathway may also play a role in the growth of neuroendocrine tumors. Increased expression of MET correlates with decreased overall survival in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, Dr. Chan noted.”

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CancerConnect Launches Online Community for Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors

Excerpt:

“OMNI Health Media (OMNI) announces the launch of a new online community on CancerConnect for individuals with neuroendocrine tumors (NET). This community will provide patients and their loved ones with information and support. Join the conversation in the NET community here.

“Although neuroendocrine tumors have historically been considered rare, the incidence of neuroendocrine tumors has been increasing.  Recent statistics suggest that the current number of people with neuroendocrine tumors exceeds 100,000 in the United States—more than the number of people with other, better known cancers like pancreatic or stomach cancer. The increase in NET diagnoses parallels improved diagnosis and treatments around the world.”

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