Side Effects of New Immune-Based Lung Cancer Drug Manageable

Preliminary results from an ongoing early clinical trial of the new lung cancer drug nivolumab show that the treatment is tolerable. Out of 43 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with nivolumab and chemotherapy, slightly less than half experienced serious side effects. In most cases, these side effects were manageable with medication and/or discontinuation of nivolumab. Nivolumab targets PD-1, a protein on the surface of immune cells that switches off the immune response when it binds to another protein, PD-L1, which is often expressed on tumors. By inhibiting PD-1, nivolumab enables the immune system to continue attacking cancer cells. Additional clinical trials focusing on patients with squamous or non-squamous NSCLC will investigate whether nivolumab is more effective than the chemotherapy drug docetaxel (Taxotere).


Nivolumab Extends Life in Melanoma Patients in Early Trial

An experimental immunotherapy drug called nivolumab may increase survival in people with melanomas that have spread. Nivolumab blocks a protein called PD-1, which lets tumor cells evade the immune system. In a phase I trial of melanoma patients who had not responded to previous treatments, researchers found tumors shrank in 41% of those given the highest dose of nivolumab (3 mg/kg). Overall, 62% survived to 1 year and 43% survived to 2 years and only 2% had severe side effects. Nivolumab is currently being tested in three phase III trials. These findings were among several advances in immunotherapy treatments for melanoma presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s 2013 meeting.


Nivolumab Plus Ipilimumab in Advanced Melanoma

“In patients with melanoma, ipilimumab (an antibody against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 [CTLA-4]) prolongs overall survival, and nivolumab (an antibody against the programmed death 1 [PD-1] receptor) produced durable tumor regression in a phase 1 trial. On the basis of their distinct immunologic mechanisms of action and supportive preclinical data, we conducted a phase 1 trial of nivolumab combined with ipilimumab in patients with advanced melanoma.”


Immunotherapies Offer Bright Prospects in Advanced Melanoma

“Inspired by the 2011 approval of ipilimumab, the immunotherapy paradigm is experiencing a fervent revival in metastatic melanoma. As attendees heard at the Melanoma/Skin Cancers Oral Abstract Session on Saturday afternoon, three novel strategies that provoke the body’s immune system to attack melanomas are enabling patients to live better and longer with their disease, further fueling the remarkable advances achieved in the field over the past 2 years.”


New therapy is tolerable in lung cancer

A promising new therapy for the most common form of lung cancer appears to produce largely manageable side effects, and an ongoing clinical trial is determining whether the compound treats tumors more effectively than what’s on market…

promising new therapy for the most common form of lung cancer appears to produce largely manageable side effects, and an ongoing clinical trial is determining whether the compound treats tumors more effectively than what’s on the market, according research that scientists at Fox Chase Cancer Center will present at the 49th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology on Saturday, June 1.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-therapy-tolerable-lung-cancer.html#jCp

promising new therapy for the most common form of lung cancer appears to produce largely manageable side effects, and an ongoing clinical trial is determining whether the compound treats tumors more effectively than what’s on the market, according research that scientists at Fox Chase Cancer Center will present at the 49th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology on Saturday, June 1.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-therapy-tolerable-lung-cancer.html#jCp

promising new therapy for the most common form of lung cancer appears to produce largely manageable side effects, and an ongoing clinical trial is determining whether the compound treats tumors more effectively than what’s on the market, according research that scientists at Fox Chase Cancer Center will present at the 49th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology on Saturday, June 1.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-therapy-tolerable-lung-cancer.html#jCp


Combination of Two Immunotherapy Agents May Work Better Than Either Alone


Results from a phase I trial combining two immunotherapy antibodies—the already-approved ipilimumab (Yervoy) and the still experimental nivolumab—suggest combining the agents may benefit advanced melanoma patients even more than either agent alone. Jedd Wolchok, MD, PhD, medical oncologist and immunotherapy and melanoma expert at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City presented the data at an American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) press meeting on May 15, 2013. The full results from the trial will be presented at the annual ASCO meeting this June. Continue reading…


Two Immune System Boosters May Be Better Than One for Melanoma

A phase I clinical trial suggests that the combination of two immunotherapy drugs—ipilimumab and nivolumab—may shrink melanomas far more than either does alone. Ipilimumab is the standard melanoma treatment in much of the world; nivolumab is an experimental drug developed by the pharmaceutical firm Bristol-Myers Squibb. The researchers treated 52 melanoma patients with the combination and found that tumors shrank in about half of them. This shrinkage exceeded 80% in nearly one-third of the patients. These results will be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and a phase III trial of the combination ipilimumab/nivolumab treatment is scheduled to start in June 2013.


Phase I Trial Suggests Ipilimumab and PD-1 Drug Nivolumab May Be Better Together than Alone for Advanced Melanoma

“Results from a phase I study show that combination therapy with ipilimumab (Yervoy) and the investigational antibody drug nivolumab led to lasting tumor shrinkage in approximately half of patients with aggressive, advanced melanoma. The results will be presented at the 2013 ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago…”


Combining an Immune Checkpoint Antibody with an Anti-Angiogenesis Inhibitor


A small phase I study combining the immune checkpoint antibody ipilimumab with the angiogenesis inhibitor antibody bevacizumab showed promising results in advanced melanoma patients in 2011. Now, researchers are continuing to study the combination of immunotherapy and anti-angiogenic agents to understand which patients could best benefit from such a combination. Continue reading…