Strosberg Discusses Latest Lutathera Data in Midgut Neuroendocrine Tumors

Excerpt:

“In December 2016, the FDA informed Advanced Accelerator Applications that its new drug application for Lutathera (177Lutetium DOTA-octreotate) as a treatment for patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) would need to be resubmitted.

“The application was based on the phase III NETTER-1 trial, which randomized patients with advanced, progressive, somatostatin receptor-positive midgut NETS to receive either Lutathera (116 patients) plus best supportive care, including octreotide long-acting repeatable (LAR), or octreotide LAR alone (113 patients).”

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New Drug in Development Shows Improved Progression-Free Survival for Patients with Advanced Metastatic Midgut Neuroendocrine Tumors

Excerpt:

“A new therapy in development for the treatment of midgut neuroendocrine tumors, a rare type of cancer that occurs in the small intestine and colon, shows improved progression-free survival and response rates for patients with advanced disease. Results of the international phase 3 clinical trial of lutetium-177 (177Lu)-Dotatate compared to high-dose octreotide LAR were published in the Jan. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

” ‘Patients diagnosed with midgut neuroendocrine tumors often have advanced disease that has spread to other sites. Treatment options are limited. 177Lu-Dotatate is an effective option to delay tumor progression for patients with this disease,’ says Jonathan R. Strosberg, head of the Neuroendocrine Tumor Program at Moffitt Cancer Center. ‘There is also preliminary evidence of survival benefit that requires confirmation on final survival analysis, expected in several years.’ ”

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New Treatments for Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors


Neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive system (GI-NETs) can arise in different parts of the digestive tract. GI-NETs originating in the ileum, duodenum, and appendix are known as midgut NETs, and tumors of the stomach, colon, and rectum are non-midgut NETs. Many of these tumors are functional; that is, they produce a variety of hormonal substances that cause serious, debilitating symptoms. Continue reading…


Expert Discusses Emerging Treatments, Immunotherapy Potential in pNETs

“Several recent studies have shown promise for the treatment of pancreatic NETs (pNETs). In the phase II CALGB-80701, which investigated the addition of bevacizumab (Avastin) to a treatment paradigm of everolimus and octreotide (Sandostatin) LAR in patients with locally advanced or metastatic pNETs, bevacizumab extended progression-free survival (PFS) by more than 3 months compared with everolimus and octreotide LAR alone.

“Response rate was also higher in the bevacizumab arm, with a 31% response to everolimus plus bevacizumab versus a 12% response in the control arm. Toxicity, however, was significantly higher in the bevacizumab arm.”


Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Lesser Threat than Adenocarcinomas, but Still Hard to Treat


Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) constitute only about 3% to 5% of all pancreatic cancers. Compared to the most common pancreatic cancer—adenocarcinoma (aka exocrine tumors), PNETs have a longer disease course and better prognosis; the 5-year survival rate is 42% for PNETs, but only about 5% to 6% for adenocarcinomas. When PNETs are localized, they can usually be removed by surgery. However, PNETs tend to metastasize, most often to the liver, and present a formidable treatment challenge at this stage. Continue reading…


Hormone-Mimicking Drugs Are Used To Treat Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (GEP-NETs)


Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can arise wherever neuroendocrine (hormone-producing) cells are found—which is in most organs. Most NETs (65%-70%) are gastroenteropancreatic, or GEP, arising in different gastrointestinal organs. GEP-NETs are most commonly found in the small bowel (including the appendix), stomach, and rectum. Still, NETs in general are rare, which complicates the development of new treatments and identification of the genetic drivers of these cancers. Treatment of GEP-NETs is clearly an unmet medical need, and is now even more urgent because their incidence has been on the rise in the last 20 years. Continue reading…