Do You Have Pain, Cancer, or Diabetes? Your PBM May Now Be Your Doctor for These Illnesses.

A Q&A with Charles L. Bennett, MD, PhD, MPP; Smart State and Frank P and Jose M Fletcher Chair, Medication Safety and Efficacy, Smart State Center of Economic Excellence, University of South Carolina and the Hollings Cancer Center at the Medical University of South Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina; Email: charlesleebennett@gmail.com

Originally published December 27, 2017

Q: The opioid epidemic is now a public health emergency in the United States. Diabetes is now the leading public health emergency worldwide. We recently (June 21, 2017) discussed how Pharmaceutical Benefit Managers (PBMs) have developed from 1968 to controlling not only pricing, discounts, and drug selection for > 250 million Americans, but are also threatening to become the prescriber. Does this raise heightened concerns as the country faces two public health epidemics of opioids and diabetes, in particular?

A: You and I continue to believe that medical care responsibility logically devolves to the doctor who cares for the patient and is accountable for management, treatment, and outcomes. We are increasingly wrong. Since medicines have grown in cost and pharmaceutical costs continue to increase, profit-oriented businesses muscle the patient and the doctor (and stay tuned, even the hospital) out of the way. Pharmacy Benefit Manager (PBM)’s plans now often replace physician choice, and if the physician’s choice is expensive, they replace it with more profitable alternatives, a practice known as non-medical switching. These concerns are magnified as one of the largest PBMs (CVS) seeks to merge with one of the largest health insurers (AETNA), ultimately increasing PBM involvement where patients receive care. Just as worrisome is the “invisible” hand of PBMs in restricting treatment options for chronic pain often experienced by cancer patients and others.

Continue reading…


Cancer Pain and the Opioid Epidemic

A Q&A with Kevin Sevarino, MD, PhD, President-elect of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry and Consulting Psychiatrist at Gaylord Hospital in Wallingford, CT

Q: Opioid abuse, addiction, and overdose are huge American problems right now. Many cancer patents experience chronic pain. What is the best way to use opioids to manage chronic pain?

[Note: The views expressed below represent the opinion of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry nor those of Gaylord Hospital.]

A. We live in amazing times. Targeted immunotherapies, stem cell transplants of transfected cells, identification of unique molecular targets in cancer cells through differential gene expression profiling—all promise to expand survival rates (or cures!) with diminished adverse effects compared to the “blunt hammer” approach of chemotherapy, radiation treatments, and more. Continue reading…