Osimertinib Approved in China for EGFR T790M+ NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) has approved osimertinib for the treatment of patients with locally-advanced or metastatic EGFR T790M-positive non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with progression following treatment with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI).

“Osimertinib was approved under the CFDA’s accelerated Priority Review Pathway. To receive the treatment, patients must have their EGFR T790M mutation status confirmed through a validated test.”

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Tagrisso Demonstrates Superiority over Chemotherapy in EGFR T790M Mutation-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“AstraZeneca today presented data from the AURA3 trial that data is supportive of Tagrisso (osimertinib) potentially becoming the new standard of care for 2nd-line treatment of patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) T790M mutation-positive locally-advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The first randomised Phase III data showed that Tagrisso 2nd-line therapy improved progression-free survival (PFS) by 5.7 months compared with standard platinum-based doublet chemotherapy (Hazard Ratio [HR]=0.3). The results were presented at the 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) in Vienna, Austria, hosted by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and published simultaneously online in The New England Journal of Medicine.”

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AZ' Tagrisso Hits Goals in Second-Line Lung Cancer Trial

Excerpt:

“A Phase III trial assessing AstraZeneca’s lung cancer drug Tagrisso has met its primary endpoint in showing superior progression-free survival compared to standard chemotherapy.

“The AURA3 trial assessed the efficacy and safety of Tagrisso (osimertinib) as a second-line treatment in more than 400 patients with EGFR T790M mutation-positive, locally-advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), whose disease had progressed following first-line EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy.

“Full data are to be unveiled at an upcoming medical conference, AZ said, but did also reveal that, in addition to PFS, the objective response rate, disease control rate and duration of response also achieved clinically meaningful improvement versus chemotherapy, while the drug’s safety profile was also consistent with earlier findings.”

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Plasma vs Tissue Genotyping and Outcomes With Osimertinib in Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) positive for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor T790M resistance mutation on a plasma assay had similar outcomes with the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor osimertinib (Tagrisso) as did those who were positive on tissue genotyping, according to a study reported by Oxnard et al in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The findings suggest that a validated plasma assay may allow some patients to avoid tumor biopsy for detection of the mutation.”

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Lung Cancer Highlights from ASCO 2016


This year, the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) did not produce any truly groundbreaking revelations about new treatments for lung cancer. However, researchers did report quite a few positive findings, and some disappointing ones. I have summarized some of the more prominent presentations below. Continue reading…


Osimertinib Demonstrates Early Efficacy for Leptomeningeal Disease in NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Phase I findings of a study examining the efficacy of osimertinib (Tagrisso) in heavily pretreated patients with EGFR-mutated advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and leptomeningeal disease showed promising activity in the patient population.

“In the BLOOM study, which was presented during the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting, treatment with the third-generation EGFR TKI osimertinib was associated with radiologic improvement of leptomeningeal disease in 33% and neurologic improvement in patients who presented with neurologic impairment at baseline. In addition, 2 of the 21 patients (9.5%) enrolled experienced clearing of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology, said James Chih-Hsin Yang, MD, PhD, who announced the results.”

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Tagrisso (Osimertinib) Shows Clinical Activity in Patients with Leptomeningeal Disease from Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“AstraZeneca today announced clinical and safety data for osimertinib in patients with leptomeningeal (LM) disease, a complication of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC),1 where cancer cells spread to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). LM is a devastating disease often associated with advanced lung cancer.

“The updated BLOOM Phase I trial results, presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting, showed that irrespective of T790M mutation status of patients, osimertinib demonstrated activity through assessments with MRI imaging intracranial response.”

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First-Line Osimertinib Yields Nearly 80% Response in Advanced Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“First-line osimertinib, a targeted therapy against EGFR mutations, was found to be effective in patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), resulting in a 77% overall response rate, according to the results of recent study. In addition, the treatment-naive patients in the study achieved a median progression-free survival of 19.3 months.

“The data from two phase I expansion cohorts were presented by Suresh Ramalingam, MD, professor of hematology and medical oncology at Emory School of Medicine and deputy director of the Winship Cancer Institute in Atlanta, at the European Lung Cancer Conference 2016 in Geneva (LBA 1_PR).”

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Frontline Osimertinib Approaches 80% Response in EGFR+ NSCLC

Excerpt:

“First-line treatment with single-agent osimertinib (Tagrisso) induced a response rate of 77% in patients with EGFR-mutated non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to phase I data1 presented at the 2016 European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC).

“The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 19.3 months for patients receiving osimertinib at 160 mg once daily (n = 30) and was not yet reached for patients receiving the third-generation EGFR TKI at a dose of 80 mg once daily (n = 30). The median duration of response was 16.7 months with 160 mg and non-calculable in the 80-mg group.

“ ‘The overall response rate was among the best reported for first-line therapy of EGFR-mutated NSCLC,’ lead author Suresh Ramalingam, MD, professor of Hematology and Medical Oncology at Emory School of Medicine and deputy director of Winship Cancer Institute, said in a statement.”

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