Lung NETs and Their Treatment


Cancers that arise in the lung are mostly of the type known as NSCLC (non-small cell lung carcinoma). A much smaller proportion of lung tumors arise from neuroendocrine cells in the lungs. These cells (which are also found in most other organs) secrete a variety of hormones that are necessary for normal organ function, as well as for healing after injury or infection. Like other lung cells, neuroendocrine cells may transform to become cancers. Lung cancers that arise from neuroendocrine cells are called pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), or lung NETs. Continue reading…


Drugs to Avoid in Patients on Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

Editor’s note: More and more people with cancer are being treated with drugs known as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). As with any other drug, oncologists who prescribe TKIs must be aware of other drugs a patient is taking to ensure there will not be a dangerous drug-drug interaction. Researchers recently published a report outlining known and potential drug-drug interactions between TKIs and other drugs. Oncologists and patients may wish to take these into account when considering cancer treatment with TKIs.

“With the rapid and widespread uptake of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in oncology over the past several years, serious drug–drug interactions are an “increasing risk,” according a new report.

“To guarantee the safe use of TKIs, ‘a drugs review for each patient is needed,’ write Frank G.A. Jansman, PharmD, PhD, from Deventer Hospital in the Netherlands, and colleagues in a review published in the July issue of the Lancet Oncology.

“The review provides a comprehensive overview of known and suspected interactions between TKIs and conventional prescribed drugs, over-the-counter drugs, and herbal medicines.

“All 15 TKIs approved to date by the US Food and Drug Administration or the European Medicines Agency are evaluated.

“They are axitinib (Inlyta, Pfizer), crizotinib (Xalkori, Pfizer), dasatinib (Sprycel, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Otsuka America), erlotinib (Tarceva, Osi Pharmaceuticals), gefitinib (Iressa, AstraZeneca), imatinib (Gleevec, Novartis), lapatinib (Tykerb, GlaxoSmithKline), nilotinib (Tasigna, Novartis), pazopanib (Votrient, GlaxoSmithKline), regorafenib (Stivarga, Bayer), ruxolitinib (Jakafi, Incyte), sorafenib (Nexavar, Bayer), sunitinib (Sutent, Pfizer), vandetanib (Caprelsa, AstraZeneca), and vemurafenib (Zelboraf, Roche).”


18F-FGD-PET Measures Predict mRCC TKI Response

“Positron emission tomography (PET) could be used to predict the response of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy within a couple of weeks of a patient beginning treatment, research suggests.

“Changes in volume-based metabolic parameters of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) before and after 14 days of treatment with sunitinib, sorafenib or pazopanib significantly correlated with progression-free and overall survival, say Jacob Farnebo (Karokinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden) and co-authors.”

Editor’s note: Doctors and patients can make more informed treatment decisions if they can more closely monitor how well a treatment is working and predict how well it is likely to work in the long run. This story discusses how monitoring with positron emission tomography (PET) within the first couple of weeks of treatment might help predict how well certain drugs will work. PET scanning produces 3-D images of the inside of the body. Scientists conducted a study in which they gave PET scans to volunteer patients who were being treated with the drugs sunitinib, sorafenib, or pazopanib for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). They found that, within two weeks of the patients starting treatment, they could use information from the PET scans to determine the effectiveness of the treatment. They were able to link these PET scan results to how long the patients lived and how much time passed before patients’ disease worsened.