Another Anti-PD1 Immunotherapy Shows Promise for Melanoma Patients


Following in the footsteps of positive results for the drug nivolumab, another anti-PD1 antibody, lambrolizumab (formerly MK-3475), is also showing promising activity in melanoma. At the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Antoni Ribas, MD, PhD, of the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of California, Los Angeles, presented data from a large, 1,000-plus patient phase I trial that also included other cancer types. Continue reading…


Side Effects of New Immune-Based Lung Cancer Drug Manageable

Preliminary results from an ongoing early clinical trial of the new lung cancer drug nivolumab show that the treatment is tolerable. Out of 43 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with nivolumab and chemotherapy, slightly less than half experienced serious side effects. In most cases, these side effects were manageable with medication and/or discontinuation of nivolumab. Nivolumab targets PD-1, a protein on the surface of immune cells that switches off the immune response when it binds to another protein, PD-L1, which is often expressed on tumors. By inhibiting PD-1, nivolumab enables the immune system to continue attacking cancer cells. Additional clinical trials focusing on patients with squamous or non-squamous NSCLC will investigate whether nivolumab is more effective than the chemotherapy drug docetaxel (Taxotere).


New Immune-Based Drug Shows Signs of Effectiveness in Several Cancers

The new cancer drug MPDL3280A has produced promising results in an early clinical trial that investigated patients with various advanced cancers including lung cancer; melanoma; and cancer of the kidney, intestines, or stomach. All participants had previously seen their cancer worsen despite treatment. Yet, during treatment with MPDL3280A, tumors shrank significantly in more than one-fifth of the patients. Response rates were especially high in lung cancer and melanoma patients. Of the patients who responded to MPDL3280A, almost all continue to see effects now, 3 to 15+ months into the study. MPDL3280A targets a protein, PD-L1, that is often expressed on cancer cells and ‘hides’ the cells from the body’s immune response; by blocking PD-L1, MPDL3280A allows the immune system to attack the tumors. Further studies will be needed to confirm these findings.


New Immune-Based Drug Shows Signs of Effectiveness in Several Cancers

The new cancer drug MPDL3280A has produced promising results in an early clinical trial that investigated patients with various advanced cancers, including lung cancer; melanoma; and cancer of the kidney, intestines, or stomach. All participants had previously seen their cancer worsen despite treatment. Yet, during treatment with MPDL3280A, tumors shrank significantly in more than one-fifth of the patients. Response rates were especially high in lung cancer and melanoma patients. Of the patients who responded to MPDL3280A, almost all continue to see effects now, 3 to 15+ months into the study. MPDL3280A targets a protein, PD-L1, that is often expressed on cancer cells and “hides” the cells from the body’s immune response; by blocking PD-L1, MPDL3280A allows the immune system to attack the tumors. Further studies will be needed to confirm these findings.


Anti–PD-L1 Drug Shows Promising Anticancer Effects in a Variety of Advanced Cancers

A phase I expansion study of the investigational drug MPDL3280A— an engineered PD-L1 targeted antibody—shows impressive tumor shrinkage rates in patients with several different cancers—including lung, melanoma, kidney, colorectal, and gastric cancers—that had progressed despite several prior treatments.


Anti–PD-L1 Drug Shows Promising Anticancer Effects in a Variety of Advanced Cancers

“A phase I expansion study of the investigational drug MPDL3280A— an engineered PD-L1 targeted antibody—shows impressive tumor shrinkage rates in patients with several different cancers—including lung, melanoma, kidney, colorectal, and gastric cancers—that had progressed despite several prior treatments. The results will be presented at the 2013 ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago…”


Engineered antibody demonstrated safety, efficacy in wide range of advanced tumors

The engineered antibody MPDL3280A, which targets a protein called programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), was safe and effective for several cancers, according to phase I study results.


Sizing up a slow assault on cancer

Rise of immunotherapies spurs search for markers of response — Jedd Wolchok braced himself as he walked into the examination room to deliver bad news to his patient. Scans showed that the man’s advanced melanoma had spread, and new tumours had sprouted, even though he had received an experimental therapy called ipilimumab (Yervoy) to rally his immune system against the disease…”