Monoclonal Antibody Treatment in Newly Diagnosed Pediatric High-Grade Glioma

Excerpt:

“In a phase II study reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Grill et al found that the addition of bevacizumab (Avastin) to radiotherapy plus temozolomide (RT + TMZ) did not improve event-free survival in pediatric patients with newly diagnosed high-grade glioma.

“In the international open-label study, 121 patients aged 3 to 18 years with localized nonbrainstem disease from 51 sites in 14 countries were randomized between October 2011 and February 2015 to receive RT + TMZ with (n = 62) or without (n = 59) bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks. RT + TMZ consisted of RT at 1.8 Gy 5 days per week and TMZ at 75 mg/m2 per day for 6 weeks followed by a 4 weeks off, then up to twelve 28-day cycles at 150 mg/m2 per day on days 1 to 5 in cycle 1 and 200 mg/m2 per day on days 1 to 5 in cycles 2 to 12. The primary endpoint was event-free survival on blinded central radiology review. Results are reported as of 12 months after the enrollment of the last patient.”

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Study Splits Incurable Childhood Brain Tumors Into 10 New Diseases

Excerpt:

“Scientists have found that deadly childhood brain tumours are actually 10 different diseases that should each be diagnosed and treated based on their specific genetic faults.

“The major new study has important implications for treatment, since personalising care for each type of   is likely to be much more effective than grouping them all together as one.

“A team at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, found stark differences among ‘s ‘high grade’ , or gliomas, and that they could be split into at least 10 different cancers.”

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Potential Treatment for Brain Cancer as Drug Shrinks Tumours

Excerpt:

“An international team of researchers has found a drug previously approved to treat breast cancer could also be used to shrink medulloblastoma, a common form of childhood brain tumour.

“The discovery, made by The University of Queensland’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, has led to a clinical trial using the drug palbociclib to treat children with medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumour found in children.”

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Researchers Assess Pinworm Medication for Adults, Children With Glioblastoma

Excerpt:

“Researchers at Johns Hopkins University are conducting the first clinical trials to evaluate the potential of a pinworm medication for the treatment of children and adults with newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

“Mebendazole has been used for more than 40 years to treat parasitic infections.

“Although the medication requires further testing in patients with cancer, results of a phase 1 trial have shown the medication is safe for and tolerated by adults with glioblastoma. An additional phase 1 trial is underway to assess the agent in children.”

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New Insight Into Life-Threatening Childhood Brain Cancer

Excerpt:

“The most common type of malignant childhood brain cancer has been identified as seven separate conditions each needing a different treatment, new research has revealed.

“A study by Newcastle and Northumbria universities has found that childhood medulloblastoma can be separated into seven different subgroups which all have their own biological and clinical characteristics.”

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Further Reductions in Radiotherapy to Young Children With Brain Tumors Less Successful

Excerpt:

“A team of investigators has determined that young children participating in a clinical trial to assess the effectiveness of reduced radiotherapy did worse when there were deviations from the treatment protocol. Results of the study will be available online in advance of publication by Pediatric Blood & Cancer on April 4.

” ‘This study shows that attention to the timing, dose, and location of radiation therapy is crucial,’ Kenneth K. Wong, MD, a radiation oncologist at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and first author on the study.

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Promising New Strategy to Attack the Most Lethal Brain Tumor in Children

Excerpt:

“Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago have revealed new insight into how the most deadly pediatric brain tumor, diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), may develop. They also have identified a compound that targets the ‘on’ switch for cancer-promoting genes, which resulted in shrinking tumor size and increased survival in an animal model of DIPG. Preparations for a clinical trial at Lurie Children’s are now under way.”

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Targeted Treatment May Be Feasible in Pediatric Brain Tumors

Excerpt:

“Results from a large clinical study showed that testing pediatric brain tumors for genetic abnormalities is feasible and could play a role in guiding patients’ treatment.

“The study, published in Neuro-Oncology, showed that more than half of the samples taken from pediatric brain tumors and analyzed using genomic profiling had genetic irregularities that could influence how the disease was diagnosed or treated with approved drugs or agents being evaluated in clinical trials.”

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Press Release: Sheri Sobrato Brisson and Eric Brisson Join Cancer Commons to Find Better Treatment Options for Children with Brain Cancer

Sheri Sobrato Brisson (Photo by Irene Searles for InMenlo.com; used
with permission)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Los Altos, California – January 25, 2017 – Cancer Commons, a nonprofit network of physicians, scientists and patients dedicated to helping each patient achieve the best possible outcome, announces the launch of a new program to identify personalized treatment options for children with brain cancer. The program is funded by a generous lead gift from Sheri Sobrato Brisson, a pediatric brain tumor survivor and advocate for children with serious illness, and her husband Eric Brisson.

“We are motivated to help children with brain cancer by giving their physicians and families access to the best treatment plans,” shares Sheri Sobrato Brisson. “Diagnosis is a frightening time, and patients and their families need help to quickly sort through vast, confusing amounts of information to assure them that they are making the best possible choices.” Continue reading…