Lobectomy Linked to Better Outcomes in Lung Cancer Than Wedge Resection

Small, early-stage lung cancers can be removed using either wedge resection (removal of a small, wedge-shaped piece of lung that contains the cancer and a margin of healthy tissue around the cancer) or lobectomy (removal of the entire subsection, or lobe, of the lung that contains the cancer). A study of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that was less than 2 cm in diameter and had not spread to the lymph nodes (stage T1N0) showed that those who received lobectomy were more likely to remain cancer-free and had higher survival rates compared to those who received wedge resection. The study authors recommend lobectomy as the preferred treatment for small NSCLC tumors, with wedge resection reserved for patients whose lung function would be decreased too much by lobectomy.


Combined Calsed and S-1 May Be Effective Second-Line Treatment for Lung Cancer without EGFR Mutations

While new treatments for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and Alimta (pemetrexed), are effective second-line treatments for patients whose tumors carry mutations in the EGFR gene, they are less effective for patients without such mutations. Twenty-six patients with inoperable, previously treated NSCLC received treatment with amrubicin (Calsed) and S-1 and experienced higher treatment response rates, longer periods without cancer progression, and longer overall survival than has been reported with single-agent chemotherapy. The beneficial effects were independent of cancer subtype, suggesting that combined Calsed and S-1 may be an effective second-line treatment for NSCLC without EGFR mutation.

Research paper: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00280-012-2061-1/fulltext.html