Abiraterone/ADT Combo Increased Prostate Cancer Survival

Excerpt:

“Combined therapy with abiraterone acetate/prednisone plus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) significantly improved overall survival and radiographic progression-free survival (PFS) among men with metastatic hormone-naive prostate cancer compared with ADT and placebo alone, according to the results of the phase III LATITUDE trial (abstract LBA3) presented at the 2017 ASCO Annual Meeting.

” ‘In my opinion, these findings support the fact that adding abiraterone and prednisone to castration should now be considered the new standard of care for men with newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer,’ said researcher Karim Fizazi, MD, PhD, head of the department of cancer medicine at Gustave Roussy, University Paris-Sud, Villejuif, France.”

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Adding Pemetrexed to Gefitinib Improves PFS in EGFR-Mutated NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The combination of pemetrexed and gefitinib offered improved progression-free survival (PFS) over gefitinib alone in East Asian patients with advanced nonsquamous non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and activating EGFR mutations, according to a new randomized, open-label study.

“EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) including gefitinib have been shown to improve outcomes in patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC. ‘Given their different mechanisms of action, combination treatment with EGFR-TKIs and chemotherapy may further improve outcomes,’ wrote study authors led by James Chih-Hsin Yang, MD, PhD, of National Taiwan University Hospital in Taipei. Previous trials of such combinations have not shown clinical benefit, however, though this could have been because of antagonism between the agents used or because wild-type EGFR patients were included.”

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Binimetinib Improves PFS in NRAS-Mutated Metastatic Melanoma

Excerpt:

“The novel MEK inhibitor binimetinib resulted in improved progression-free survival (PFS) and response rates vs dacarbazine in patients with NRAS-mutated advanced unresectable/metastatic melanoma, according to results of an open-label phase III trial.

“ ‘NRAS mutations are present in approximately 20% of all patients with metastatic melanoma,’ said Reinhard Dummer, MD, of the University Hospital Zurich in Switzerland. ‘It activates the MAPK pathway and by this drives cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic mechanisms.’ Preclinical studies have shown that NRAS-mutant melanoma is sensitive to MEK inhibition, and binimetinib inhibits both MEK1 and MEK2. A phase II study showed clinical activity in NRAS-mutant metastatic melanoma.

“The NEMO trial included 402 patients randomized 2:1 to receive either binimetinib (269 patients) or dacarbazine (133 patients; 19 were not treated and were not evaluated for safety). Patients were either treatment-naive or had progressed on or after immunotherapy. The primary endpoint of the study was PFS. The results were presented at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting held earlier this month in Chicago (abstract 9500).”

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Palbociclib Addition to Letrozole Improved PFS in ER+/HER2- Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Palbociclib (Ibrance), when added to letrozole, increased the median progression-free survival (PFS) rate in patients with ER-positive, HER2-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer by >10 months, according to results from the phase III PALOMA-2 trial presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting. 

“The risk of disease progressed was reduced by 42 with the addition of palbociclib, a CDK4/6 inhibitor, when compared with letrozole alone. The combination of palbociclib and letrozole was granted an accelerated approval in February 2015, based on the phase II PALOMA-1 study. These results from PALOMA-2 provide confirmation of the combination’s benefits in the frontline setting.

“ ‘These data represent the longest frontline improvement in median PFS seen to date in women with advanced ER+ breast cancer,’ senior study author Dennis J. Slamon, MD, PhD, chief of the Division of Hematology/Oncology in the UCLA Department of Medicine, said when presenting the findings at ASCO.”

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Immunomedics’ Sacituzumab Govitecan (IMMU-132) Demonstrates Efficacy and Safety in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Multiple Prior Treatments, Including Immuno-Oncology

Excerpt:

Immunomedics, Inc., (IMMU) today announced that sacituzumab govitecan (IMMU-132), its lead investigational antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), shrank tumors by 30% or more initially in 26% (12/46) of evaluable patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with a later confirmed overall objective response rate (ORR) of 13%, in accordance with RECIST 1.1 criteria. For the patients with confirmed responses, the duration of response (DOR) was 9 months.

“Interim median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 3.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI]; 3.4, 6.9) and 10.5 months (95% CI; 5.8, 10.5), respectively. Significant tumor shrinkage and disease stabilization was observed in both adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinomas, the two major subtypes of NSCLC, and in patients who had failed previous anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy.”

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Pfizer Presents Promising Data from Next Generation ALK/ROS1 Inhibitor in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Pfizer Inc. (NYSE:PFE) today announced encouraging new data from a Phase 1/2 study of lorlatinib, the proposed generic name for PF-06463922, Pfizer’s investigational, next-generation ALK/ROS1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The study showed clinical response in patients with ALK-positive or ROS1-positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including patients with brain metastases. These data were presented today in an oral presentation at the 52nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago.

“The results presented are from the dose escalation component of an ongoing Phase 1 study of patients with ALK-positive or ROS1-positive NSCLC, with or without brain metastases, who were treatment-naïve or had disease progression after at least one prior tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Among patients with ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC, the overall response rate (ORR) with lorlatinib was 46 percent, with three patients achieving complete responses and 16 patients achieving a partial response (95% CI: 31-63). The median progression free survival (PFS) was 11.4 months (95% CI: 3.4 – 16.6). The majority of patients had received two or more prior ALK TKIs. Additionally, lorlatinib showed the ability to decrease the size of brain metastases in patients with ALK-positive or ROS1-positive metastatic NSCLC.”

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Advanced Breast Cancer Slowed with Avastin Combo (CME/CE)

Excerpt:

“Adding bevacizumab (Avastin) to letrozole (Femara) improved progression-free survival (PFS) in estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer (ER+MBC) but not other outcomes, an open-label, multicenter phase III trial showed.

“While median PFS increased by 4.6 months in patients who received combined therapy versus letrozole alone, there was no significant difference in overall survival (hazard ratio 0.87; 95% CI 0.65-1.18; P=0.188), Maura N. Dickler, MD, of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, and colleagues reported online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“In addition, there was a marked increase in grade 3 to 4 toxicities, particularly hypertension (24% versus 2%) and proteinuria (11% versus 0%), the researchers said, emphasizing that the role of bevacizumab in this setting will need to be clarified with research on predictive markers.”

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Crizotinib Tops Chemo for ALK-Positive NSCLC With Brain Metastases

Excerpt:

“First-line crizotinib therapy offered better intracranial disease control rate (IC-DCR) than chemotherapy in patients with ALK-positive non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and stable treated brain metastases, according to results of a phase III study.

“Earlier results from the ongoing PROFILE 1014 trial showed that crizotinib offers better progression-free survival (PFS) and response rates compared with pemetrexed-platinum chemotherapy. ‘Although the development of targeted therapies has improved outcomes for selected patient populations with oncogenic driver mutations, brain metastases are frequent and result in significant morbidity and mortality in patients with lung cancer,’ wrote study authors led by Benjamin J. Solomon, MBBS, PhD, of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in East Melbourne, Australia.”

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Androgen Suppression Plus RT Improves DFS in Prostate Ca

“Adding 6 months of androgen suppression (AS) to radiation therapy improved biochemical disease-free survival in high-risk localized prostate cancer patients – even at radiation doses of 78 Gy – and it did so with acceptable adverse effects, according to a randomized European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer trial reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“At 7.2 years’ median follow-up, the study found that combination therapy led to a 5-year biochemical disease-free survival of 82.6% (95% CI 78.4-86.1) versus 69.8% for radiation alone (95% CI 64.9-74.2) – translating to a hazard ratio of 0.52 (95% CI 0.41-0.66, P=0.001, 319 events). Adjuvant AS also improved clinical progression-free survival, for an HR of 0.63 (95% CI 0.48-0.84, P=0.001, 205 events).

“No statistically significant interaction between treatment effect and radiation dose emerged: heterogeneity P=0.79 and P=0.66, for biochemical disease-free survival and progression-free survival, respectively, according to Michel Bolla, MD, of Grenoble University Hospital in France, and colleagues.”