Patients With Breast Cancer Harboring AR Biomarker Likely to Respond to Enzalutamide

Excerpt:

“In patients with hormone receptor (HR)-positive advanced breast cancer and no prior endocrine therapy who were positive for a gene signature-based biomarker indicating androgen receptor (AR)-signaling, the addition of enzalutamide (Xtandi) to exemestane was found to significantly improve progression-free survival (PFS) from 4 months to 16.5 months.

“Moreover, the phase II trial showed no effect of enzalutamide on PFS in the overall cohort of patients nor in the biomarker-positive population who received prior endocrine therapy, said Denise Yardley, MD, at the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.”

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Antibody-Drug Conjugate Improves Responses In Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Treatment with IMMU-132 (sacituzumab govitecan) elicited an objective response rate (ORR) of 34 percent in patients with heavily pretreated metastatic triple-negative breast cancer, according to updated findings from a phase 2 study presented at the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS).

“In the 110-patient single-arm trial, the ORR was accompanied by stable disease (SD) for 6 months or more in 11 percent of patients, for an overall disease control rate of 45 percent. The median progression-free survival (PFS) with IMMU-132 was 5.5 months and the median overall survival (OS) was 12.7 months.”

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Three-Drug Breast Cancer Regimen Slows Progression

Excerpt:

“Adding a drug to a standard regimen for hormone receptor (HR)-positive and HER2-positive breast cancer improved progression-free survival, a researcher said here.

“In a Phase II randomized trial, investigators compared an aromatase inhibitor (AI) combined with pertuzumab (Perjeta) and trastuzumab (Herceptin) versus an AI just with trastuzumab in women with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, Grazia Arpino, MD, PhD, of the University of Naples Federico II in Italy, reported at a general session at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

“The three-drug combination led to a median of 18.89 months without progression, compared with 15.8 months for the two drugs.”

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Hormonal Therapy Effectively Added to Dual HER2-Blockade in Phase II PERTAIN Study

Excerpt:

“The addition of an aromatase inhibitor (AI) to pertuzumab (Perjeta) and trastuzumab (Herceptin) improved progression-free survival (PFS) by 3.09 months, when compared with trastuzumab plus an AI, according to findings from the phase II PERTAIN trial presented at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

“In the ongoing, open-label study, the median PFS was 18.89 months with the pertuzumab combination compared with 15.80 months for trastuzumab and an AI alone. Furthermore, there was a 35% reduction in the risk of progression or death with the addition of pertuzumab (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.48-0.89; P = .007).”

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Neoadjuvant Abemaciclib Active in HR+/HER2- Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“A neoadjuvant regimen combining the CDK4/6 inhibitor abemaciclib with anastrozole induced a response rate of 54.7% in patients with HR+/HER2-negative early-stage breast cancer, according to findings from the phase II neoMONARCH trial presented at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

“The study also met its primary endpoint of reduction in Ki67 expression level at week 2. The abemaciclib combination yielded a geometric mean change in Ki67 from baseline to day 15 of -92.6%.”

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GTx Reports Results from Ongoing Enobosarm Phase 2 Clinical Trial in ER+/AR+ Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“GTx, Inc. (GTXI) announced today positive initial data from its ongoing open-label enobosarm Phase 2 clinical trial in women with advanced, estrogen receptor positive (ER+), androgen receptor positive (AR+) breast cancer. The pre-specified threshold for success of the trial was met early in the 9 mg cohort with 9 patients achieving a clinical benefit response at 24 weeks among the first 22 evaluable patients in that cohort, as reported by the Company on November 28, 2016. Clinical Benefit Response (CBR) is defined as a complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD), as measured by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) at 24 weeks of treatment.”

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Adding Everolimus to Fulvestrant Improved Outcomes for Postmenopausal Patients With HR-positive Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Progression-free survival was more than doubled for patients with metastatic hormone receptor (HR)-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer resistant to aromatase inhibitor therapy by adding everolimus (Afinitor) to treatment with the endocrine therapeutic fulvestrant (Faslodex), according to data from the PrECOG 0102 phase II clinical trial presented at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 6–10.

” ‘Endocrine therapy, often with an aromatase inhibitor, is the standard of care for most patients with HR-positive advanced breast cancer,’ said Noah S. Kornblum, MD, assistant professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and attending physician, medicine at Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care. ‘However, over time, resistance to aromatase inhibitors develops and treating patients with aromatase inhibitor–resistant disease remains a challenge.’ ”

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G1 Therapeutics to Evaluate Trilaciclib (G1T28) in Combination with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor in Small-Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“G1 Therapeutics, Inc., a clinical-stage oncology company, announced today a clinical trial collaboration with Genentech, a member of the Roche Group. A Phase 2 clinical trial is expected to begin in the first half of 2017 and will evaluate the combination of Genentech’s immune checkpoint, anti-PD-L1 antibody Tecentriq® (atezolizumab) with G1’s CDK4/6 inhibitor trilaciclib (G1T28) as a first-line treatment for patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) receiving chemotherapy.”

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Enobosarm Meets Pre-Specified Primary Efficacy Endpoint in Ongoing Phase 2 Clinical Trial in ER+/AR+ Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“GTx, Inc. (Nasdaq: GTXI) today announced that enobosarm achieved the pre-specified primary efficacy endpoint in the 9 mg dose cohort from patients in both stage 1 and the ongoing stage 2 of its Phase 2 clinical trial in women with advanced, estrogen receptor positive (ER+), androgen receptor positive (AR+) breast cancer. The primary efficacy endpoint requires at least nine patients (out of a total of 44 evaluable patients) to achieve clinical benefit, defined as either a complete response, partial response or stable disease, as measured by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) at 24 weeks of treatment. In this ongoing trial, the efficacy endpoint was achieved in the first 22 confirmed evaluable patients, and the trial will continue enrolling and treating eligible patients with enobosarm until 44 evaluable patients have completed the trial. Enobosarm has been well tolerated among patients treated to date in the 9 mg dose cohort with the majority of adverse events being either grade 1 or 2.”

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