Tumor-Treating Fields for Glioblastoma Do Not Negatively Impact Quality of Life

Excerpt:

“The addition of tumor-treated fields to standard therapy with temozolomide prolonged deterioration-free survival without negatively influencing health-related quality of life among patients with glioblastoma, according to a secondary analysis of a phase 3 clinical trial published in JAMA Oncology.

“However, tumor-treating fields, or TTFields (Optune, Novocure) — alternating electrical fields delivered via four transducer arrays at an intermediate frequency of 200 MHz (1-3 V/cm) placed on the shaved scalp of patients and connected to a portable medical device — also caused skin irritation in more than half of patients.”

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Bevacizumab/Lomustine Combinations Falls Short in Phase III Glioblastoma Trial

Excerpt:

“Treatment with lomustine (Gleostine) plus bevacizumab (Avastin) provided a slightly improved progression-free survival (PFS), but did not demonstrate an overall survival (OS) advantage over treatment with lomustine alone in patients with progressive glioblastoma, according to results of a randomized phase III trial published in theNew England Journal of Medicine.

“There were a total of 329 OS events (75.3%) in patients who received the combination, which did not meet the endpoint for a statistically significant benefit. The median OS was 9.1 months (95% CI, 8.1-10.1) in the group of patients who received the combination of lomustine and bevacizumab and 8.6 months (95% CI, 7.6-10.4) in the monotherapy group (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.74-1.21). Locally assessed PFS was 4.2 months in the combination group versus 1.5 months in the monotherapy group (HR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.39-0.61).”

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First Line Combination Therapy Improves Progression-Free Survival in Advanced Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“A new combination therapy for the first line treatment of advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) improves progression-free survival (PFS), according to results of the phase III IMpower150 trial presented at the ESMO Immuno Oncology Congress 2017.

” ‘This is the first phase III trial to report on the combination of chemotherapy, antiangiogenic treatment and immunotherapy as first line treatment for advanced non-squamous NSCLC,’ said lead author Professor Martin Reck, chief oncology physician, Department of Thoracic Oncology, Lung Clinic Grosshansdorf, Germany. ‘The trial met its co-primary endpoint of PFS and the preliminary results of the co-primary endpoint of overall survival (OS), although immature, look encouraging.’ ”

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Nab-Paclitaxel Shows Greatest Utility for TNBC

Excerpt:

“Treatment with nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane) showed promising improvements in overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) compared with standard paclitaxel for patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), according to post-hoc findings from the CALGB 40502/NCCTG N063H trial presented at the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS).

“For those with TNBC in the phase III trial (n = 201), the median OS with nab-paclitaxel was 21.0 months compared with 15.3 months with standard paclitaxel, representing a 26% reduction in the risk of death. Given the limitations of the post-hoc assessment, these findings were not powered for statistical significance, explained lead investigator Hope S. Rugo, MD. The hazard ratio for the comparison was 0.74 (95% CI, 0.51-1.07).”

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Targeted Therapy Can Delay Recurrence of Intermediate-Stage Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“The targeted therapy gefitinib appears more effective in preventing recurrence after lung cancer surgery than the standard of care, chemotherapy. In a phase III clinical trial, patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive, stage II-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received gefitinib went about 10 months longer without recurrence than patients who received chemotherapy. The study will be presented at the upcoming 2017 ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago.

” ‘Adjuvant gefitinib may ultimately be considered as an important option for stage II-IIIA lung cancer patients with an active EGFR mutation, and we may consider routine EGFR testing in this earlier stage of lung cancer,’ said lead study author Yi-Long Wu, MD, a director of the Guangdong Lung Cancer Institute, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, China. ‘We intend to follow these patients until we can fully measure overall survival as opposed to disease-free survival, which just measures disease recurrence.’ ”

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Fulvestrant Prolongs PFS for Women with Hormone Receptor– Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Fulvestrant prolonged PFS compared with anastrozole among women with hormone receptor– positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who have not received previous endocrine therapy, according to a phase 3, randomized, double blind trial published in The Lancet.

” ‘The primary endpoint of this phase 3 study was met, with patients receiving fulvestrant having a significantly longer PFS than patients receiving anastrozole,’ John F.R. Robertson, MD, a professor at University of Nottingham Medical School and Royal Derby Hospital Centre in Derby, United Kingdom, and colleagues wrote. ‘This represents a meaningful and relevant finding for which clinical data are limited.’ ”

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Atezolizumab Improves Survival vs Docetaxel in Previously Treated Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“In the phase III OAK trial reported in The Lancet by Rittmeyer et al, treatment with the anti–programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) antibody atezolizumab (Tecentriq) improved overall survival vs docetaxel in previously treated non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results of the trial supported the recent approval of atezolizumab in metastatic NSCLC in patients who have received prior platinum-containing therapy.”

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Immunotherapy Drug Gives Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Extra Four Months of Life

Excerpt:

“Patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer survive four months longer with fewer side effects on an immunotherapy drug called atezolizumab compared to chemotherapy, according to a phase 3 clinical trial published in The Lancet.

“The trial enrolled 1225 advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients who have no more treatment options, but this study used an early analysis of the first 850 patients from the trial. Half of the group were given atezolizumab and the other half were given docetaxel chemotherapy, which is the standard treatment for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

“Patients given atezolizumab – a drug that blocks the programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) protein – survived for an average of 13.8 months, compared with 9.6 months for those on chemotherapy.”

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Icotinib Improves Intracranial PFS in EGFR-Mutant NSCLC and Brain Mets

Excerpt:

“Treatment with icotinib more than doubled intracranial progression-free survival (iPFS) compared with whole brain irradiation (WBI) combined with standard chemotherapy, according to phase III trial results presented at the 17th World Lung Cancer Conference, the Annual Meeting of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), in Vienna.

“Icotinib significantly improved median iPFS, the trial’s primary endpoint, to 10.0 months compared with 4.8 months in patients treated with WBI and chemotherapy, HR = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.36-0.90 (P = .014). Secondary endpoints of the trial, including progression-free survival (PFS) and the objective response rate (ORR), were also significantly improved with icotinib over WBI/chemotherapy. Median PFS was 6.8 versus 3.4 months, respectively (HR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.31-0.63 [P < .001]).”

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