AZ' Tagrisso Hits Goals in Second-Line Lung Cancer Trial

Excerpt:

“A Phase III trial assessing AstraZeneca’s lung cancer drug Tagrisso has met its primary endpoint in showing superior progression-free survival compared to standard chemotherapy.

“The AURA3 trial assessed the efficacy and safety of Tagrisso (osimertinib) as a second-line treatment in more than 400 patients with EGFR T790M mutation-positive, locally-advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), whose disease had progressed following first-line EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy.

“Full data are to be unveiled at an upcoming medical conference, AZ said, but did also reveal that, in addition to PFS, the objective response rate, disease control rate and duration of response also achieved clinically meaningful improvement versus chemotherapy, while the drug’s safety profile was also consistent with earlier findings.”

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Prostate Cancer: Unexpected Results from International Phase III Study

Excerpt:

“A recently published international clinical Phase III trial of a promising drug for treating advanced prostate cancer ended with surprising results: the new therapeutic agent failed to achieve any significant improvement in the overall survival of patients compared with the established standard treatment. This and other data from the study have now been published in the leading magazine Journal of Clinical Oncology. Researchers from MedUni Vienna played a significant part in the study. The study was coordinated by the recently nominated ‘best hospital’ in the USA, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) of Harvard Medical School.”

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Lead NEMO Author Shares Excitement With Binimetinib in NRAS-Mutant Melanoma

Excerpt:

“For patients with NRAS-mutant melanoma who progress following treatment with an immunotherapy agent, the MEK inhibitor binimetinib offers a promising option, explains Reinhard Georg Dummer, MD.

“Results of the open-label phase III NEMO trial, which were presented during the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting,1 most recently demonstrated the agent’s potential. In the study, binimetinib was found to reduce the risk of progression or death by 38% when compared with dacarbazine in this subgroup of patients.

“Additionally, median progression-free survival (PFS) with binimetinib was 2.8 months versus 1.5 months with dacarbazine (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.47-0.80; P <.0001). The objective response rate with binimetinib was 15%, including 1 complete response, compared with 7% for dacarbazine.”

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HYPRO: Shorter RT Course No Better, Worse in Localized Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“A randomized phase III trial found that a hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) regimen was not superior to, but generally equivalent to a conventional RT scheme in men with localized prostate cancer. The study joins a growing body of literature on hypofractionation in this malignancy, generally showing that the shorter courses are a reasonable option.

“A low α-β ratio for prostate cancer has generated interest in hypofractionation, as it could increase the tumor dose without increasing toxicities. ‘Moreover, hypofractionated radiotherapy is delivered in fewer fractions, improving patients’ convenience, hospital logistics, and possibly reducing healthcare costs,’ wrote study authors led by Luca Incrocci, MD, PhD, of Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

“A study was presented at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago that found a hypofractionated regimen of 60 Gy in 20 fractions was noninferior to conventional RT. Another, presented this past January at the ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, again found a 60 Gy/20 fractions regimen was noninferior to conventional RT and to another hypofractionated regimen of 57 Gy/19 fractions.”

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Puma Biotechnology Submits Marketing Authorization Application for PB272 (Neratinib) as Extended Adjuvant Treatment of HER2-Positive Early Stage Breast Cancer in Europe

Excerpt:

“Puma Biotechnology, Inc. (NYSE: PBYI), a biopharmaceutical company, announced that it has submitted its Marketing Authorization Application (MAA) to the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for neratinib. The potential indication is for the extended adjuvant treatment of HER2-positive early stage breast cancer that has previously been treated with trastuzumab (Herceptin®)-based adjuvant therapy. The submission is based upon the ExteNET Phase III study, which reached its primary endpoint whereby neratinib demonstrated a statistically significant reduction of risk of invasive disease recurrence or death versus placebo.”

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Incyte Announces First Patient Treated in ECHO-301 Phase 3 Study

Excerpt:

“Incyte Corporation (INCY) today announced that the first patient has been treated in the ECHO-301 study—a Phase 3 trial evaluating epacadostat, Incyte’s investigational, highly potent and selective oral IDO1 inhibitor, in combination with Keytruda®(pembrolizumab), Merck’s anti-PD-1 therapy, as first-line treatment for patients with advanced or metastatic melanoma. Incyte expects initial data from the ECHO-301 study to be available in 2018…

“ ‘We are very pleased to treat the first patient in the ECHO-301 study and advance the Phase 3 program evaluating epacadostat in combination with pembrolizumab,’ said Steven Stein, M.D. Incyte’s Chief Medical Officer. ‘This trial—the first to test this combination in a pivotal study—is part of the larger ECHO program evaluating epacadostat, including combination studies with anti-PD-1 and PD-L1 therapies across multiple tumor types.’ “

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Binimetinib Improves PFS in NRAS-Mutated Metastatic Melanoma

Excerpt:

“The novel MEK inhibitor binimetinib resulted in improved progression-free survival (PFS) and response rates vs dacarbazine in patients with NRAS-mutated advanced unresectable/metastatic melanoma, according to results of an open-label phase III trial.

“ ‘NRAS mutations are present in approximately 20% of all patients with metastatic melanoma,’ said Reinhard Dummer, MD, of the University Hospital Zurich in Switzerland. ‘It activates the MAPK pathway and by this drives cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic mechanisms.’ Preclinical studies have shown that NRAS-mutant melanoma is sensitive to MEK inhibition, and binimetinib inhibits both MEK1 and MEK2. A phase II study showed clinical activity in NRAS-mutant metastatic melanoma.

“The NEMO trial included 402 patients randomized 2:1 to receive either binimetinib (269 patients) or dacarbazine (133 patients; 19 were not treated and were not evaluated for safety). Patients were either treatment-naive or had progressed on or after immunotherapy. The primary endpoint of the study was PFS. The results were presented at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting held earlier this month in Chicago (abstract 9500).”

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Palbociclib Addition to Letrozole Improved PFS in ER+/HER2- Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Palbociclib (Ibrance), when added to letrozole, increased the median progression-free survival (PFS) rate in patients with ER-positive, HER2-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer by >10 months, according to results from the phase III PALOMA-2 trial presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting. 

“The risk of disease progressed was reduced by 42 with the addition of palbociclib, a CDK4/6 inhibitor, when compared with letrozole alone. The combination of palbociclib and letrozole was granted an accelerated approval in February 2015, based on the phase II PALOMA-1 study. These results from PALOMA-2 provide confirmation of the combination’s benefits in the frontline setting.

“ ‘These data represent the longest frontline improvement in median PFS seen to date in women with advanced ER+ breast cancer,’ senior study author Dennis J. Slamon, MD, PhD, chief of the Division of Hematology/Oncology in the UCLA Department of Medicine, said when presenting the findings at ASCO.”

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3-Year Follow-Up Data for Dabrafenib/Trametinib Confirm Results of Combo in Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Three-year follow-up data from the phase III COMBI-d study was presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting, revealing impressive overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) data for the dabrafenib (Tafinlar) and trametinib (Mekinist) combination therapy for patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma.

“At the February 15, 2016 data cutoff for the 3-year analysis, 58% of patients remained on therapy. The 3-year PFS rate with the combination was 22% versus 12% with single-agent dabrafenib. The 3-year OS rate was 44% with dabrafenib plus trametinib compared with 32% with dabrafenib alone.

” ‘This is the longest OS follow-up among randomized phase III trials evaluating a BRAF plus MEK inhibitor in patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma,’ said lead investigator Keith T. Flaherty, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School. ‘With additional follow-up, and now 3-year maturity, dabrafenib plus trametinib continued to show significant benefit over dabrafenib monotherapy, despite crossover.’ ”

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