Pivotal ARMOR 3-SV Prostate Cancer Trial Discontinued After PFS Rates Miss the Mark

Excerpt:

“The pivotal phase III prostate cancer trial ARMOR 3-SV will be discontinued based on recommendations made by the trial’s independent data monitoring committee (DMC), according to the manufacturer Tokai Pharmaceuticals. The DMC concluded that ARMOR 3-SV would unlikely meet its primary endpoint of demonstrating improved radiographic progression-free survival (PFS) based on its review of all safety and efficacy data. Top-line data from the trial is not expected until next year.

“It’s a big setback for the company, which was seeking the right niche for the agent in a crowded prostate cancer treatment market. ARMOR 3-SV compared galeterone with enzalutamide (Xtandi) in patients with treatment-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), particularly in patients whose prostate tumors expressed AR-V7. These truncated ARs are missing the C-terminal end of the AR that contains the ligand-binding domain, which is known as C-terminal loss. AR-V7 is the most common form of C-terminal loss of androgen receptors (ARs), a key target in resistance. This form of AR-V7 is also thought to make patients unlikely to respond to either enzalutamide or abiraterone acetate (Zytiga).”

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Final OS Analysis Confirms Cobimetinib/Vemurafenib Benefit in Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Combination therapy with cobimetinib (Cotellic) and vemurafenib (Zelboraf) reduced the risk of death by 30% compared with vemurafenib alone in patients with BRAF-positive advanced melanoma, according to the final survival analysis of the phase III coBRIM study that has now been published in The Lancet Oncology.

“The targeted combination improved median overall survival (OS) by 4.9 months versus single-agent vemurafenib (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.55-0.90; P = .005). The OS rates for the combination at 1 and 2 years were 74.5% and 48.3%, respectively.

“ ‘Melanoma is one of the few cancers that has increased in incidence over the past 30 years, and until recently, people with advanced forms of the disease have had few treatment options. Five years ago, the survival of people with advanced melanoma was measured in months, and now we have medicines that are helping people live years,’ Josina Reddy, MD, PhD, senior group medical director at Genentech, the company that manufactures the combination, said in an interview with OncLive.”

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AstraZeneca Provides Update on Phase III Trial of Selumetinib in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“AstraZeneca today announced results from the Phase III SELECT-1 trial of the MEK 1/2 inhibitor, selumetinib, in combination with docetaxel chemotherapy as 2nd-line treatment in patients with KRAS mutation-positive (KRASm) locally-advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

“The results showed that the trial did not meet its primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS), and selumetinib did not have a significant effect on overall survival (OS). The adverse event profiles for selumetinib and docetaxel were consistent with those seen previously.”

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Marine Drug Goes to Phase III Trials to Treat Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“PharmaMar is starting a new Phase III trial, with patients suffering from small cell lung cancer (SCLC). It’ll test the efficacy of its third candidate obtained from marine organisms (PM1183) as a SCLC treatment.

“PharmaMar is one of the hot Biotechs in Spain, which just saw its second drug finish Phase III trials with good results (and is already in trials for other indications, as we’ve seen at ASCO).

“Now, PM1183 is under the spotlight. This cancer drug will be used in a second Phase III trial (after ovarian cancer). It’ll enrol 600 patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), for whom platinum-based treatments have failed before.”

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AZ' Tagrisso Hits Goals in Second-Line Lung Cancer Trial

Excerpt:

“A Phase III trial assessing AstraZeneca’s lung cancer drug Tagrisso has met its primary endpoint in showing superior progression-free survival compared to standard chemotherapy.

“The AURA3 trial assessed the efficacy and safety of Tagrisso (osimertinib) as a second-line treatment in more than 400 patients with EGFR T790M mutation-positive, locally-advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), whose disease had progressed following first-line EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy.

“Full data are to be unveiled at an upcoming medical conference, AZ said, but did also reveal that, in addition to PFS, the objective response rate, disease control rate and duration of response also achieved clinically meaningful improvement versus chemotherapy, while the drug’s safety profile was also consistent with earlier findings.”

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Prostate Cancer: Unexpected Results from International Phase III Study

Excerpt:

“A recently published international clinical Phase III trial of a promising drug for treating advanced prostate cancer ended with surprising results: the new therapeutic agent failed to achieve any significant improvement in the overall survival of patients compared with the established standard treatment. This and other data from the study have now been published in the leading magazine Journal of Clinical Oncology. Researchers from MedUni Vienna played a significant part in the study. The study was coordinated by the recently nominated ‘best hospital’ in the USA, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) of Harvard Medical School.”

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Lead NEMO Author Shares Excitement With Binimetinib in NRAS-Mutant Melanoma

Excerpt:

“For patients with NRAS-mutant melanoma who progress following treatment with an immunotherapy agent, the MEK inhibitor binimetinib offers a promising option, explains Reinhard Georg Dummer, MD.

“Results of the open-label phase III NEMO trial, which were presented during the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting,1 most recently demonstrated the agent’s potential. In the study, binimetinib was found to reduce the risk of progression or death by 38% when compared with dacarbazine in this subgroup of patients.

“Additionally, median progression-free survival (PFS) with binimetinib was 2.8 months versus 1.5 months with dacarbazine (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.47-0.80; P <.0001). The objective response rate with binimetinib was 15%, including 1 complete response, compared with 7% for dacarbazine.”

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HYPRO: Shorter RT Course No Better, Worse in Localized Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“A randomized phase III trial found that a hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) regimen was not superior to, but generally equivalent to a conventional RT scheme in men with localized prostate cancer. The study joins a growing body of literature on hypofractionation in this malignancy, generally showing that the shorter courses are a reasonable option.

“A low α-β ratio for prostate cancer has generated interest in hypofractionation, as it could increase the tumor dose without increasing toxicities. ‘Moreover, hypofractionated radiotherapy is delivered in fewer fractions, improving patients’ convenience, hospital logistics, and possibly reducing healthcare costs,’ wrote study authors led by Luca Incrocci, MD, PhD, of Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

“A study was presented at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago that found a hypofractionated regimen of 60 Gy in 20 fractions was noninferior to conventional RT. Another, presented this past January at the ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, again found a 60 Gy/20 fractions regimen was noninferior to conventional RT and to another hypofractionated regimen of 57 Gy/19 fractions.”

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Puma Biotechnology Submits Marketing Authorization Application for PB272 (Neratinib) as Extended Adjuvant Treatment of HER2-Positive Early Stage Breast Cancer in Europe

Excerpt:

“Puma Biotechnology, Inc. (NYSE: PBYI), a biopharmaceutical company, announced that it has submitted its Marketing Authorization Application (MAA) to the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for neratinib. The potential indication is for the extended adjuvant treatment of HER2-positive early stage breast cancer that has previously been treated with trastuzumab (Herceptin®)-based adjuvant therapy. The submission is based upon the ExteNET Phase III study, which reached its primary endpoint whereby neratinib demonstrated a statistically significant reduction of risk of invasive disease recurrence or death versus placebo.”

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