Poziotinib Shows Encouraging Activity Among Heavily Pretreated NSCLC Subgroup

Excerpt:

“Poziotinib (NOV120101, HM781-36B) demonstrated high antitumor activity in patients with metastatic, heavily pretreated EGFR and HER2 exon 20 mutant non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to phase II study results presented at the 19th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) in Toronto, Canada.

To date, the agent specifically induced a best response rate of 55%, including a 43% confirmed objective response rate (ORR) among evaluable patients with EGFR exon 20 mutant NSCLC in the study, said John V. Heymach, MD, PhD, who presented data of the investigator-initiated study of poziotinib in EGFR and HER 2-exon 20 mutant NSCLC (NCT03066206).”

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Targetable Mutations in NSCLC: More Testing Needed!


Diagnosis of adenocarcinoma of the lung, a major subtype of non-small lung cancer (NSCLC), nowadays triggers mandatory testing of tumor tissue for alterations in four genes: EGFR, ALK, ROS1, and more recently, BRAF. If present, these alterations predict sensitivity to specific targeted drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that work better and often longer than standard chemotherapy, and are better tolerated.

However, there are many more targetable/actionable genomic alterations (also known as “drivers”) in NSCLC. This blog post will briefly discuss most of them, with the goal of promoting molecular testing for more than the four “usual suspects” mentioned above. Some patients with these alterations may benefit from FDA-approved drugs or from enrollment in clinical trials that are testing additional drugs and drug combinations. Continue reading…


Drug Yields High Response Rates for Lung Cancer Patients With Harsh Mutation

Excerpt:

“A targeted therapy resurrected by the Moon Shots Program™ at The University of Texas MD AndersonCancer Center has produced unprecedented response rates among patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer that carries a highly treatment-resistant mutation.

“In a phase 2 clinical trial, the drug poziotinib has shrunk tumors by at least 30 percent in eight of 11 (73 percent) non-small cell lung cancer patients whose cancer includes an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation called an exon 20 insertion.  Shrinkage ranged from 30 percent to 50 percent among the eight patients reaching partial response.  One patient has progressed on the clinical trial, which began in March.  All patients experienced some tumor shrinkage.”

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EGFR-mutant NSCLC: Choice of First-Line Treatment May Get More Complicated


Medical guidelines for treatment of newly diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) mandate upfront testing of tumor tissue for mutations in the EGFR gene (as well as ALK and ROS gene translocation). EGFR mutations are found in 10 to 15% of white patients, but in patients of East Asian origin such mutations are in encountered in approximately 48%. However, with new data and drugs entering the playing field, newly diagnosed patients’ treatment decisions could become more complex.

There is a good reason to test for EGFR mutations: the accumulated data show that, compared to first-line chemotherapy, treatment with drugs that inhibit the activity of EGFR in patients with activating EGFR mutations improves patients’ median progression-free survival (PFS) time from 4.6 to 6.9 months to 9.6 to 13.1 months, and has a higher objective response rate (ORR). Moreover, EGFR inhibitors are associated with a significantly lower incidence of adverse effects and better control of disease symptoms. Continue reading…