TGEN-UCSF Study Uses Genomics to Make Treatment Recommendations for Recurrent Glioblastoma Patients

Excerpt:

“Several patients with recurring glioblastoma, a deadly brain cancer, survived for more than a year in a clinical trial believed to be the first to use comprehensive DNA and RNA sequencing of a patient’s tumor to inform treatment for these patients in real-time. The study was led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), UC San Francisco (UCSF) and the Ivy Foundation Early Phase Clinical Trials Consortium.”

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If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Cancer Commons Participates in Lively Discussion of Precision Medicine at PMWC 2017


Update 3-1-17: A video of this event has now been released. Watch it below.

This year’s Precision Medicine World Conference in Mountain View, California, was well-attended by many members of Cancer Commons, who shared in the scientific discoveries that will lead the way to more personalized, accurate, and effective cancer care. Precision medicine is a rapidly evolving field with many breakthroughs in science, technology, and diagnosis that is transforming the way cancer care is practiced at the bedside.

A special session was co-chaired by Cancer Commons board member Larry Marton and Lincoln Nadauld, director of the personalized oncology program at Intermountain Healthcare in Utah. The session also featured Cancer Commons medical director Kevin Knopf, Mountain View oncologist Edmund Tai, and Tim Collins, who is corporate vice president of operations and research at Scripps Health in San Diego. Continue reading…


Is Metastatic Prostate Cancer Tailor-Made for Precision Oncology?

“Metastatic prostate cancer presents an appealing target for precision oncology, according to new work from scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington. In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Medicine, the researchers showed that though metastases from different patients varied widely in their genetic characteristics, metastases within a single patient were remarkably similar. These results suggest not merely that patients with metastatic prostate cancer may benefit from treatment tailored to their particular tumors, but also that a single biopsy may provide enough information to oncologists to guide such therapy.

“ ‘If you look in multiple metastases within a given patient, they’re actually very, very similar,’ said Dr. Pete Nelson, the study’s lead author and a prostate cancer researcher at Fred Hutch and oncologist at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, the Hutch’s treatment arm. Unlike initial tumors in the prostate, in which molecular characteristics can vary by location, the tumor cells that break free and travel to distant locations within the body, forming metastases, appear to share characteristics. ‘They’re not identical, but they are very similar… We can feel generally confident, at least with prostate cancer, that if you did sample a single tumor, you could make clinical decisions based on what you find.’ “


Low Enrollment in Genomically Matched Clinical Trials After Genomic Testing

“In an analysis reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Meric-Bernstam and colleagues at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found that a small minority of patients with potentially actionable genes identified in large-scale testing were enrolled onto clinical trials targeting the alterations.

“The study included 2,000 consecutive patients with advanced cancer who underwent testing in a genomic testing protocol. Standardized hotspot mutation analysis was performed using either an 11-gene (251 patients) or a 46- or 50-gene (1,749 patients) multiplex platform. A total of 35 genes were considered potentially actionable, given the potential to be targeted with approved or investigational therapies.

“In total, 789 patients (39%) had at least one mutation in potentially actionable genes. Of them, 83 (11%) were enrolled in genotype-matched trials targeting these alterations. Among 230 patients with PIK3CA/AKT1/PTEN/BRAF mutations who returned for therapy, 116 (50%) received a genotype-matched drug; of them, 40 (17%) were treated in a genotype-selected trial requiring a mutation for eligibility, 16 (7%) were treated in a genotype-relevant trial targeting a genomic alteration without biomarker selection, and 40 (17%) received a genotype-relevant drug off trial.”


Landmark Gift of $100 Million from the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Foundation Will Support Groundbreaking Approach to Precision Oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

“Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center today launched an ambitious initiative to improve cancer care and research through genomic analysis. The new program will reshape clinical trials and speed the translation of novel molecular discoveries into routine clinical practice…

“ ‘Progress in our understanding of the biology of cancer has completely shifted the way we think about and treat cancer,’ says Craig Thompson, MD, MSK President and CEO. ‘We’re moving away from the concept of treating cancer as many different types of the same disease and toward treating each person’s cancer as its own unique disease. Now, thanks to the inspiring generosity of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Foundation, we will be able to expand and intensify this effort, ushering in what will truly be a new era of precision medicine.’ ”

Editor’s note: Learn more about personalized approaches to cancer treatment.


Landmark Gift of $100 Million from the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Foundation Will Support Groundbreaking Approach to Precision Oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

“Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center today launched an ambitious initiative to improve cancer care and research through genomic analysis. The new program will reshape clinical trials and speed the translation of novel molecular discoveries into routine clinical practice…

“ ‘Progress in our understanding of the biology of cancer has completely shifted the way we think about and treat cancer,’ says Craig Thompson, MD, MSK President and CEO. ‘We’re moving away from the concept of treating cancer as many different types of the same disease and toward treating each person’s cancer as its own unique disease. Now, thanks to the inspiring generosity of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Foundation, we will be able to expand and intensify this effort, ushering in what will truly be a new era of precision medicine.’ ”

Editor’s note: Learn more about personalized approaches to cancer treatment.


Landmark Gift of $100 Million from the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Foundation Will Support Groundbreaking Approach to Precision Oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

“Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center today launched an ambitious initiative to improve cancer care and research through genomic analysis. The new program will reshape clinical trials and speed the translation of novel molecular discoveries into routine clinical practice…

“ ‘Progress in our understanding of the biology of cancer has completely shifted the way we think about and treat cancer,’ says Craig Thompson, MD, MSK President and CEO. ‘We’re moving away from the concept of treating cancer as many different types of the same disease and toward treating each person’s cancer as its own unique disease. Now, thanks to the inspiring generosity of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Foundation, we will be able to expand and intensify this effort, ushering in what will truly be a new era of precision medicine.’ ”

Editor’s note: Learn more about personalized approaches to cancer treatment.


Big Data Meets Cancer: Netflix CPO Neil Hunt Explains Why Cancer Commons Matters in TEDx Talk

Late last year, Netflix Chief Product Officer and Cancer Commons supporter Neil Hunt gave a talk at TEDxBeaconStreet. He believes that big data analysis outside of traditional clinical trials can help identify personalized treatments for individual patients that can significantly improve their chances of survival. As Hunt explains, Cancer Commons is an exciting embodiment of this new approach to life-saving cancer research. Watch the video:


Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology Publishes Paper by Marty Tenenbaum

Today the journal Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology published a paper written by Cancer Commons founder Marty Tenenbaum and co-author Jeff Shrager. The piece discusses the concept of Rapid Learning Precision Oncology. In this approach, every patient receives the best available treatment for them, based on the specifics of their diagnosis. Then the outcomes (e.g., tumor shrinkage, side effects, quality of life, etc.) are used to support and refine the treatment model on which patients’ treatment decisions are based. Tenenbaum and Shrager review the Rapid Learning Precision Oncology approach and the many challenges to its implementation.

Read the article: Rapid learning for precision oncology. Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology. Jan 21, 2014. doi: 10.1038/nrclinonc.2013.244

Please contact us if you are interested in a pdf of the paper.