The Economist Publishes Cancer Commons Founder Marty Tenenbaum’s Letter to the Editor

Cancer Commons founder Marty Tenenbaum wrote a letter to the editor that has now been published in The Economist. His piece discusses the importance of using data to accelerate improvement of cancer treatment. From the letter:

“The oncology drug pipeline is full of promising immunotherapies and targeted treatments (Technology Quarterly on cancer, September 16th). Unfortunately, no one knows the optimal way to use them. Doctors and patients alike struggle with conflicting expert opinions and the information overload. Moreover, a cure will probably involve intelligent combinations of remedies, and there are far more plausible regimens than there are patients available to test them in clinical trials. Treatments, outcomes and quality of life vary widely across institutions, falling off sharply from elite cancer centres to rural, disadvantaged and third-world communities. Continue reading…


BioQuick News Covers Marty Tenenbaum’s Recent PMWC Presentation

A new article from BioQuick News discusses Cancer Commons founder Marty Tenenbaum’s presentation at last week’s Personalized Medicine World Conference:

In the PMWC 2017 discussion, Dr. Tenenbaum focused on the question: When faced with certain death, is it acceptable to accept less than 100% proven safety and efficacy? Patients with glioblastoma and certain other cancers with dire prognoses do not have the time to wait for new treatments to be fully approved by the FDA. Is it time to add ‘conditional approval’ as an additional pathway to approval for these patients? In the session, he described a plan that will be proposed by which the FDA could “conditionally approve” a treatment that has been proven safe in a clinical trial(s) with at least 25 patients, and has demonstrated biologic activity. Therefore, this treatment could not be denied by insurance as being “experimental.”

Read the full article here.


Medical Director Kevin Knopf Discusses Cancer Commons in Xconomy Article

In a recent Xconomy article on cancer DNA testing, Cancer Commons medical director Kevin Knopf shares his perspective:

“To help all patients we think an open-source database has the most utility,” says Knopf. Instead of current tests that list a patient’s mutations and potential drugs to use, a report should rank therapies the way online travel sites rank best options.

Read the full article here.


Interview with Medical Director Kevin Knopf

In a new interview, oncologist and Cancer Commons Medical Director Dr. Kevin Knopf gives his perspective on the future of cancer research and treatment, including the role of Cancer Commons. He also discusses the potential benefits of value frameworks, which are tools that take a variety of factors into account in order to aid treatment decisions.

Read the full interview here.


Radiologists Encouraged to Recommend Cancer Commons to Their Patients

At last week’s Radiological Society of North America Annual Meeting, radiologists were encouraged to use social media to guide patients to valuable online resources—including Cancer Commons. Social media gives doctors a great opportunity to connect with patients, said Elliot Fishman, MD, at the meeting in Chicago. He urged radiologists to use social media platforms to promote sites like radiologyinfo.org that can help patients learn and be more engaged in their own care.

We encourage radiologists to tell their patients about Ask Cancer Commons. This service helps patients connect with experts to answer questions about treatment, diagnosis, clinical trials, and more.

A stronger online presence could also allow radiologists to monitor and respond to reviews, improving their relationships with patients. Read more at Medscape.

 


Arizona Capitol Times: "Computer Scientist's Path to Beating Cancer Spawned a Data-Driven Treatment Approach"

The Arizona Capitol Times tells the story of how Marty Tenenbaum’s personal experience with cancer led him to found Cancer Commons:

The result of Tenenbaum’s quest for effective personalized medicine is the nonprofit network of patients, doctors and scientists known as Cancer Commons. The organization’s mission is to ensure that patients and physicians have the knowledge they need to make the best possible personalized treatment decisions while continuously updating that knowledge based on each patient’s response.

The project is ongoing for Tenenbaum and his staff, since the more information they gather from individual cancer patients, the more specific – and effective – their treatments can be.

“It’s what gets me up every morning. It’s huge,” he said.

Read more: http://azcapitoltimes.com/news/2015/05/26/computer-scientists-path-to-beating-cancer-spawned-a-data-driven-treatment-approach/#ixzz3dL7RgcBx


Genome Magazine Covers Cancer Commons

New personalized medicine publication Genome features Cancer Commons in its latest issue. The article highlights Cancer Commons’ mission, with supporting remarks from Founder Marty Tenenbaum, PhD, and Executive Director William Wong, PhD.

From the article:

“[Cancer Commons is] the very model of personalized medicine, a way for cancer patients to have their unique challenges analyzed against the largest data set possible and be shown the most relevant data to their individual case. This is important for patients who often feel like they are adrift once they’re diagnosed, Tenenbaum says.”

Read the whole story.