Adding Radiation Treatments to Inoperable Lung Cancer Increases Survival by up to One Year

Excerpt:

“Patients with unresectable, or inoperable, lung cancer are often given a dismal prognosis, with low rates of survival beyond a few years. Researchers exploring combination therapies have recently discovered improved survival rates by up to one year when patients treated with a newly formulated chemotherapy regimen are also given radiation therapy.

“A group of patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (mNSCLC) who had already been enrolled in a clinical trial were given radiation therapy, in addition to their treatment with a novel chemotherapy formulation, mPEBev, which was designed for its immune-modulating and anti-angiogenic effects. The mPEBev regimen is composed of fractionated cisplatin, oral etoposide, and bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody that inhibits blood vessel growth in the tumor. Treatments were administered metronomically, spaced out in the safest possible doses to reduce side-effects and toxicity.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Young Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Breast Conserving Surgery See Improved Prognosis

Excerpt:

“A new analysis indicates that breast cancer prognoses have improved over time in young women treated with breast conserving surgery. The analysis included 1331 patients younger than 40 years treated with breast conserving surgery and whole breast radiotherapy in a single cancer centre in Italy between 1997 and 2010.

“Breast cancer recurrences and deaths significantly decreased over time. A dramatic improvement in prognosis was observed after 2005, when the use of several new diagnostic and  were implemented in routine clinical practice.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Test Identifies Breast Cancer Patients With Lowest Risk of Death

Excerpt:

“A molecular test can pinpoint which patients will have a very low risk of death from breast cancer even 20 years after diagnosis and tumor removal, according to a new clinical study led by UC San Francisco in collaboration with colleagues in Sweden. As a result, ‘ultralow’ risk patients could be treated less aggressively and overtreatment avoided, leading to fewer toxic effects.

” ‘This is an important step forward for personalizing care for women with ,’ said lead author Laura J. Esserman, MD, MBA, a breast cancer specialist and surgeon with UC Health. ‘We can now test small node-negative breast cancers, and if they are in the ultralow risk category, we can tell women that they are highly unlikely to die of their cancers and do not need aggressive treatment, including radiation after lumpectomy.’ ”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Oncotype DX® Predicts 10-year Risk of Developing Metastatic Prostate Cancer in Low- and Intermediate-risk Patients

Excerpt:

“Genomic Health, Inc. (Nasdaq: GHDX) today announced the presentation of new results from a large multi-center validation study, which confirmed that the Oncotype DX® Genomic Prostate Score™ (GPS) is a strong independent predictor of metastases at 10 years in prostate cancer patients across all National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) clinical risk groups. The clinical validation study data were designated one of the ‘best posters’ (abstract #352) at the 32nd Annual European Association of Urology (EAU) Congress in London.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Outlook in HER2+ Breast Cancer Much Brighter Today Than 10 Years Ago, Expert Says

Excerpt:

“Over the last decade, the treatment landscape in HER2-positive breast cancer has changed dramatically, says Sara Hurvitz, MD.

” ‘I believe that a patient diagnosed today has a much greater chance of being alive 5 or 10 years from now—some of them may even be cured—and that compares very favorably with the outlook of 10 years ago when we just had 1 or 2 therapies and no evidence to support using HER2-targeted therapies after a patient’s disease grew,’ Hurvitz said.

“In an interview with Targeted Oncology, Hurvitz director of the Hematology/Oncology Breast Cancer Program and an associate professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, discusses ongoing advances that continue to revolutionize the treatment of patients with HER2+ breast cancer.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


A New Prognostic Classification May Help Clinical Decision-Making in Glioblastoma

Excerpt:

“New research shows that taking molecular variables into account will improve the prognostic classification of the lethal brain cancer called glioblastoma (GBM).

“The study was led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James).

“Published in the journal JAMA Oncology, the study found that adding significant molecular biomarkers to the existing GBM classification system improves the prognostic classification of GBM patients who have been treated with radiation and the drug temozolomide.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Older Breast Cancer Patients Defy Survival Models

“Older women with early-stage, invasive breast cancer had better survival rates than what was estimated by a popular online tool for predicting survival, according to researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute.

“The finding provides a stronger rationale for women over the age of 70 — even those who have additional minor health concerns — to undergo aggressive treatments such as chemotherapy to prevent their cancer from returning.

“ ‘When making decisions about whether or not to use potentially toxic preventive chemotherapy for breast cancer in older women, patients and doctors debate what they should do,’ said Gretchen Kimmick, M.D., M.S., an associate professor of medicine at Duke who is presenting the study findings at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. ‘This predictive model can help us show patients that they are going to survive long enough to see the benefit of treatment.’ “


Higher Insulin Is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Advanced Breast Cancer

“Patients with breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastasised) and who have higher insulin levels than normal, but are not diabetic, have a significantly worse prognosis compared with those with normal insulin levels, a researcher will tell the Advanced Breast Cancer Third International Consensus Conference tomorrow.

“Although the effect of higher insulin levels is already known in early breast cancer patients, it is the first time that insulin resistance, where the body’s inefficient use of insulin leads to the production of an excess, has been shown to lead to a worse outcome for metastatic breast cancer patients.

“Dr Nicoletta Provinciali, MD, an oncologist from the E.O. Ospedali Galliera, Genoa, Italy, will describe to the conference her team’s study, which involved 125 metastatic breast cancer patients. In addition to not being diabetic, all those involved had HER2 negative tumours and were receiving chemotherapy on its own (first line chemotherapy) as part of a clinical trial. The researchers assessed the relationship between insulin resistance and the length of time the patient lived without the disease getting worse (progression-free survival, or PFS) and overall survival (OS), the length of time that the patient remained alive.”


Gene Mutation Signals Poor Prognosis for Pancreatic Tumors

“For patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, the presence of recently identified mutations in two key genes is a prognostic factor for poor outcome, researchers report.

” ‘We found loss of nuclear expression in about 23% of the tumors that we studied, and this loss of expression was associated with worse tumors from the outset,’ lead investigator Michelle Heayn, MD, a second-year pathology resident at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, told Medscape Medical News.

“Pancreatic tumors with neuroendocrine histology frequently respond to chemotherapy and have a more favorable prognosis than the more common pancreatic adenocarcinomas. However, the mutations are associated with worse disease-free and disease-specific survival.”