Immunomedics’ Sacituzumab Govitecan (IMMU-132) Demonstrates Efficacy and Safety in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Multiple Prior Treatments, Including Immuno-Oncology

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Immunomedics, Inc., (IMMU) today announced that sacituzumab govitecan (IMMU-132), its lead investigational antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), shrank tumors by 30% or more initially in 26% (12/46) of evaluable patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with a later confirmed overall objective response rate (ORR) of 13%, in accordance with RECIST 1.1 criteria. For the patients with confirmed responses, the duration of response (DOR) was 9 months.

“Interim median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 3.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI]; 3.4, 6.9) and 10.5 months (95% CI; 5.8, 10.5), respectively. Significant tumor shrinkage and disease stabilization was observed in both adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinomas, the two major subtypes of NSCLC, and in patients who had failed previous anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy.”

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Pfizer Presents Promising Data from Next Generation ALK/ROS1 Inhibitor in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

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“Pfizer Inc. (NYSE:PFE) today announced encouraging new data from a Phase 1/2 study of lorlatinib, the proposed generic name for PF-06463922, Pfizer’s investigational, next-generation ALK/ROS1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The study showed clinical response in patients with ALK-positive or ROS1-positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including patients with brain metastases. These data were presented today in an oral presentation at the 52nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago.

“The results presented are from the dose escalation component of an ongoing Phase 1 study of patients with ALK-positive or ROS1-positive NSCLC, with or without brain metastases, who were treatment-naïve or had disease progression after at least one prior tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Among patients with ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC, the overall response rate (ORR) with lorlatinib was 46 percent, with three patients achieving complete responses and 16 patients achieving a partial response (95% CI: 31-63). The median progression free survival (PFS) was 11.4 months (95% CI: 3.4 – 16.6). The majority of patients had received two or more prior ALK TKIs. Additionally, lorlatinib showed the ability to decrease the size of brain metastases in patients with ALK-positive or ROS1-positive metastatic NSCLC.”

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Advanced Breast Cancer Slowed with Avastin Combo (CME/CE)

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“Adding bevacizumab (Avastin) to letrozole (Femara) improved progression-free survival (PFS) in estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer (ER+MBC) but not other outcomes, an open-label, multicenter phase III trial showed.

“While median PFS increased by 4.6 months in patients who received combined therapy versus letrozole alone, there was no significant difference in overall survival (hazard ratio 0.87; 95% CI 0.65-1.18; P=0.188), Maura N. Dickler, MD, of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, and colleagues reported online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“In addition, there was a marked increase in grade 3 to 4 toxicities, particularly hypertension (24% versus 2%) and proteinuria (11% versus 0%), the researchers said, emphasizing that the role of bevacizumab in this setting will need to be clarified with research on predictive markers.”

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Crizotinib Tops Chemo for ALK-Positive NSCLC With Brain Metastases

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“First-line crizotinib therapy offered better intracranial disease control rate (IC-DCR) than chemotherapy in patients with ALK-positive non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and stable treated brain metastases, according to results of a phase III study.

“Earlier results from the ongoing PROFILE 1014 trial showed that crizotinib offers better progression-free survival (PFS) and response rates compared with pemetrexed-platinum chemotherapy. ‘Although the development of targeted therapies has improved outcomes for selected patient populations with oncogenic driver mutations, brain metastases are frequent and result in significant morbidity and mortality in patients with lung cancer,’ wrote study authors led by Benjamin J. Solomon, MBBS, PhD, of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in East Melbourne, Australia.”

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Androgen Suppression Plus RT Improves DFS in Prostate Ca

“Adding 6 months of androgen suppression (AS) to radiation therapy improved biochemical disease-free survival in high-risk localized prostate cancer patients – even at radiation doses of 78 Gy – and it did so with acceptable adverse effects, according to a randomized European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer trial reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“At 7.2 years’ median follow-up, the study found that combination therapy led to a 5-year biochemical disease-free survival of 82.6% (95% CI 78.4-86.1) versus 69.8% for radiation alone (95% CI 64.9-74.2) – translating to a hazard ratio of 0.52 (95% CI 0.41-0.66, P=0.001, 319 events). Adjuvant AS also improved clinical progression-free survival, for an HR of 0.63 (95% CI 0.48-0.84, P=0.001, 205 events).

“No statistically significant interaction between treatment effect and radiation dose emerged: heterogeneity P=0.79 and P=0.66, for biochemical disease-free survival and progression-free survival, respectively, according to Michel Bolla, MD, of Grenoble University Hospital in France, and colleagues.”


New Treatments for Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors


Neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive system (GI-NETs) can arise in different parts of the digestive tract. GI-NETs originating in the ileum, duodenum, and appendix are known as midgut NETs, and tumors of the stomach, colon, and rectum are non-midgut NETs. Many of these tumors are functional; that is, they produce a variety of hormonal substances that cause serious, debilitating symptoms. Continue reading…


Abituzumab Improves Bone Lesion Progression, not PFS in CRPC

“Abituzumab did not extend progression-free survival (PFS) compared with placebo in a phase II study of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. The agent did, however, offer a lower incidence of bone lesion progression, and researchers say it still warrants further investigation.

“Previous research has suggested that integrins play a role in the progression of metastatic prostate cancer and associated bone lesions, wrote researchers led by Maha Hussain, MB, ChB, of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Abituzumab is a pan-αv integrin inhibitor; a phase I trial previously showed that the agent has activity in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and bone metastases.

“The new phase II trial randomized 180 patients between three arms: a 750-mg abituzumab group, a 1,500-mg abituzumab group, or placebo. All groups also received standard of care. The results were published in Clinical Cancer Research.”


Chugai’s ALK Inhibitor “Alecensa®” Trial Stopped Early for Benefit

“Chugai Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. (TOKYO: 4519) announced that it received a recommendation by an independent data monitoring committee (IDMC) that the J-ALEX Study, a phase III study targeting ALK fusion gene positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) being conducted in Japan, should be stopped early as the study met its primary endpoint at a pre-planned interim analysis. The study showed that patients lived significantly longer without disease worsening (progression-free survival, PFS) when treated with Alecensa® compared to crizotinib.

“The J-ALEX study is an open-label, randomized phase III study that compares the efficacy and safety between Alecensa and crizotinib. The J-ALEX study enrolled 207 patients with ALK fusion gene positive advanced or recurrent NSCLC who either had not undergone chemotherapy or had undergone one chemotherapy regimen. The subjects were allocated to the Alecensa group or the crizotinib group in a one to one ratio.”


Expert Discusses Emerging Treatments, Immunotherapy Potential in pNETs

“Several recent studies have shown promise for the treatment of pancreatic NETs (pNETs). In the phase II CALGB-80701, which investigated the addition of bevacizumab (Avastin) to a treatment paradigm of everolimus and octreotide (Sandostatin) LAR in patients with locally advanced or metastatic pNETs, bevacizumab extended progression-free survival (PFS) by more than 3 months compared with everolimus and octreotide LAR alone.

“Response rate was also higher in the bevacizumab arm, with a 31% response to everolimus plus bevacizumab versus a 12% response in the control arm. Toxicity, however, was significantly higher in the bevacizumab arm.”