Combined Urine Test for T2:ERG, PCA3 Ups Prostate CA Detection

Excerpt:

“Testing for combined urinary PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG (T2:ERG) RNA can improve detection of prostate cancer, according to a study published online May 18 in JAMA Oncology.

“Martin G. Sanda, M.D., from the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, and colleagues conducted a multicenter diagnostic evaluation and validation in academic and community-based ambulatory urology clinics. A sample of men presenting for first-time without preexisting prostate cancer were enrolled: 516 in the developmental cohort and 561 in the validation cohort. Urinary PCA3 and T2:ERG RNA were measured before prostate biopsy.”

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Discuss Prostate Screening With Your Doctor, Experts Now Say

Excerpt:

“Older men should talk to their doctors about the pros and cons of prostate cancer screening and make an individual decision that is right for them, an influential national panel of experts has proposed.

“The new recommendation, based on new data from a European trial as well as changes in the way men with prostate cancer are treated, modifies an earlier panel guideline from 2012 that advised men to skip prostate cancer screenings altogether. Screening is typically done using a blood test that measures levels of a protein released by the prostate gland called prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, which may indicate the presence of prostate cancer when elevated. But increased levels can also be caused by less serious medical conditions, like inflammation.”

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FDA Approves Axumin to Detect Recurrent Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“The FDA today approved Axumin, an injectable radioactive diagnostic agent used to detect recurrent prostate cancer.

“The agent is indicated for PET imaging in men who have suspected prostate cancer recurrence based on elevated PSA levels following treatment.

“The FDA based its decision on results of two studies that evaluated the safety and efficacy of Axumin (Blue Earth Diagnostics). One study compared 105 Axumin scans to histopathology obtained by prostate biopsy and by biopsies of suspicious imaged lesions in men suspected of having prostate cancer recurrence. In the second study, researchers evaluated 96 Axumin scans with C11 choline scans in patients with a median PSA of 1.44 ng/mL.”

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Role of Engrailed-2 (EN2) as a Prostate Cancer Detection Biomarker in Genetically High Risk Men

“Controversy surrounds the use of PSA as a biomarker for prostate cancer detection, leaving an unmet need for a novel biomarker in this setting; urinary EN2 may identify individuals with clinically relevant prostate cancer. Male BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at increased risk of clinically significant prostate cancer and may benefit from screening. Urine samples from 413 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and controls were evaluated. Subjects underwent annual PSA screening with diagnostic biopsy triggered by PSA > 3.0 ng/ml; 21 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Urinary EN2 levels were measured by ELISA and had a sensitivity of 66.7% and specificity of 89.3% for cancer detection. There was no statistically significant difference in EN2 levels according to genetic status or Gleason score. Urinary EN2 may be useful as a non-invasive early biomarker for prostate cancer detection in genetically high-risk individuals.”