Early Chemo Linked to Improved PFS in High-Volume Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Patients with high-volume, castration-naïve metastatic prostate cancer may have superior progression-free survival (PFS) outcomes when treated with early docetaxel, according to findings published online in the European Journal of Cancer.

“Using the Quality-adjusted Time Without Symptoms of disease and Toxicity of treatment (Q-TWiST) method, investigators also determined that the benefits associated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) plus docetaxel outweighed the risks associated with the treatment.”

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Using Alternative Medicine Only for Cancer Linked to Lower Survival Rate

Excerpt:

“Patients who choose to receive alternative therapy as treatment for curable cancers instead of conventional cancer treatment have a higher risk of death, according to researchers from the Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center at Yale School of Medicine and Yale Cancer Center. The findings were reported online by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

“There is increasing interest by  and families in pursuing alternative medicine as opposed to conventional  treatment. This trend has created a difficult situation for patients and providers. Although it is widely believed that conventional cancer treatment will provide the greatest chance at cure, there is limited research evaluating the effectiveness of alternative medicine for cancer.”

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Software Helps Men With Prostate Cancer Choose the Right Treatments

Excerpt:

“Like many men diagnosed with prostate cancer, Bill Pickett faced a tough question when he came to UCLA for treatment: how to fight it?

“Prostate  is one of the more curable cancers—it has a 96 percent survival rate 15 years after diagnosis, according to the American Cancer Society. The options men have after a diagnosis have different side effects and trade-offs. So choosing, for example, between radiation therapy or surgery, can be complicated for a person.”

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New Online Navigator Helps Patients and Doctors Access Experimental Treatments

Excerpt:

“When approved therapies don’t work, or stop working, for people with serious or life-threatening illnesses, it puts them in a difficult position. Some turn to clinical trials that are testing experimental treatments. But many can’t do that because they are too sick, don’t meet the requirements of the trial, or can’t afford to travel to the site of a trial. That doesn’t mean they are out of options.”

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Infection Is Most Common Complication of Prostate Biopsy

Excerpt:

“The most common complication of prostate biopsy is infection, with mild bleeding also reported, according to an update of the American Urological Association White Paper published in the August issue of The Journal of Urology.

“Michael A. Liss, M.D., from the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, and colleagues conducted a literature review to examine the prevalence and prevention of common complications of prostate  . They focused on , bleeding, urinary retention, needle tract seeding, and erectile dysfunction in 346 articles identified for full text review and 119 articles that were included in the final data synthesis.”

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Surgery Isn’t Necessarily Best for Prostate Cancer, According to Study Led by Minneapolis Va

Excerpt:

“The largest and longest trial to compare treatment options for prostate cancer has found little difference in outcomes between men who underwent surgery vs. those who were simply observed by their doctors.

“Led by a researcher at the Minneapolis VA Medical Center, the 20-year national study provides the best evidence yet that most men can live with their prostate cancers, avoiding the potential risks of surgery. The results, though, did show that surgery was probably a better option for younger men with long life expectancies, and some urologists dispute the findings.”

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Men Have Regret Years after Prostate Cancer Treatment

Excerpt:

“After years of introspection, about 15% of men with localized prostate cancer regretted the decisions they made regarding treatment, a survey of almost 1,000 patients showed.

“About twice as many men expressed regret after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy as compared with active surveillance. The single biggest contributor to regret was treatment-associated sexual dysfunction, as reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.”

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Prostate Cancer: Poor Responders Benefit from Taxane Switch

Excerpt:

“Men with advanced prostate cancer who respond poorly to one taxane-based chemotherapy regimen may benefit from switching to another, a small randomized trial reported.

“Nearly half of the men who did not achieve a ≥30% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level while receiving either docetaxel or cabazitaxel achieved a ≥50% decline when they switched to the other drug, said Emmanuel Antonarakis, MBBCh, of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and colleagues.”

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Risk Tool IDs Candidates for Adjuvant RT in Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“A novel risk stratification tool that combines pathologic tumor characteristics with data from the Decipher genomic classifier may help predict 5- and 10-year metastasis-free survival in patients with aggressive prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy with an accuracy of 85%, researchers reported.

“It can also be used to identify patients with prostate cancer who could benefit from postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy (aRT), thereby reducing risk of overtreatment, adverse effects, and clinical recurrence (CR), Firas Abdollah, MD, of Vattikuti Urology Institute at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, and colleagues reported online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.”

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