AR-V7+ CTCs Predicted Worse PFS, OS in mCRPC

Excerpt:

“Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) positive for the nuclear-specific AR-V7 protein was an independent predictor of shortened progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) when treating metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) with abiraterone or enzalutamide, according to results of the PROPHECY study (abstract 5004). The findings were presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), held June 1–5 in Chicago.

“’Men with AR-V7–positive CTCs have a very low probability of benefit from abiraterone or enzalutamide, ranging from 0% to 11%,’ said Andrew J. Armstrong, MD, of Duke Cancer Institute. ‘However, a lack of AR-V7 detection does not guarantee response or benefit’ where these therapies are concerned, he added.”

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Immunotherapy Could Stop Prostate Cancer Spreading, Trial Shows

Excerpt:

“Men with otherwise untreatable prostate cancer could halt its spread and survive longer by undergoing immunotherapy treatment, a trial has shown.

“More than a third of men with an advanced form of the cancer were still alive and one-in-10 had not had further growth after a year on the drug pembrolizumab, the study found.

“It is the first time immunotherapy has been shown to benefit some men with prostate cancer, the researchers said.”

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Abiraterone May Be More Effective in Black Men With Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Black men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) who received hormonal therapy with the adrenal inhibitor abiraterone had greater and longer-lasting responses compared with white men, according to the results of a late-breaking study (abstract LBA5009) presented at the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, held in Chicago June 1–5.

“The prospective study found that black men were more likely to have a decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and had a longer median time to PSA worsening than white men. The findings were presented by Daniel George, MD, professor of medicine and surgery at Duke University.”

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No Survival Bump With More Frequent PSA Screens for Localized Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Undergoing more frequent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening after radical prostatectomy or primary radiation for localized prostate cancer was not associated with improved overall survival (OS), regardless of disease risk, according to results of the AFT-30 study (abstract 6503) presented at the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, held June 1–5 in Chicago.

“‘Based on our study results, PSA testing every 3 to 6 months may represent overutilization of care,’ said Ronald Chen, MD, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ‘This study provides empiric data to inform future guidelines and clinical practice.'”

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Six Tips to Spot Cancer ‘Fake News’

Excerpt:

Cancer is a popular topic for the media, as people care and worry about it in equal measure.

“News reports help people find out what researchers are working on, and how charitable donations are being spent. They also helps generate interest in the amazing science going on. But perhaps most of all, health stories and clinical trial results have a direct impact on people, raising interest in the latest discoveries further.

“And when it comes to , the emotion that’s tied to the subject means that scientific results must be discussed in a measured and accurate way. And most of the time that’s exactly what happens.”

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Apalutamide Reduces Risk of PSA Progression by 94% in Nonmetastatic CRPC

Excerpt:

“Apalutamide (Erleada) lowered the risk of PSA progression by 94% in patients with nonmetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), according to a posthoc analysis from the phase III SPARTAN trial presented at the 2018 American Urological Association (AUA) Annual Meeting.

“The median time to PSA progression was not reached in the apalutamide arm compared with 3.71 months in the placebo group (HR, 0.064; 95% CI, 0.052-0.080; <.0001). A separate retrospective cohort study presented at AUA underscored the significance of these apalutamide data by confirming prior observations of the link between faster PSA doubling time (PSADT) and poorer metastasis-free survival (MFS) and overall survival (OS).”

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Study Finds More Than 40 Percent of Prostate Biopsies Could Be Avoided with New Blood Test

Excerpt:

A multi-center study that validates the clinical performance of IsoPSA—a new blood test that has proven to be more accurate in predicting overall risk of prostate cancer than standard prostate-specific antigen (PSA) – will be presented during a special press conference at the 13th Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA) on May 18 in San Francisco.

“Results showed that more than 40 percent of biopsies could have been avoided in both the preliminary study (45.1 percent) and validation study (47 percent), suggesting that use of IsoPSA may substantially reduce the need for , and may thus lower the likelihood of overdetection and overtreatment of nonlethal  cancer.”

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Salvage Cryoablation May Delay the Need for Hormone Therapy in Recurrent Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Salvage prostate cryoablation may be an effective treatment that can help delay the need for androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in carefully selected men with locally recurrent prostate cancer, according to a new study presented at the American Urological Association 2018 annual meeting.

“Researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center studied the outcomes of 52 men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer who were initially treated with radiation therapy but later suffered recurrence and received salvage cryoablation. The investigators identified the men from a prospective database of patients undergoing salvage cryoablation after definitive prostate radiation by external beam radiation therapy, brachytherapy, or both. While ADT is the common second-line therapy, these men instead received cryoablation.”

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Novel Radionuclide Treatment Demonstrates Promising Results in mCRPC

Excerpt:

“Updated results from the phase II LuPSMA study published in The Lancet Oncology showed radionuclide treatment with Lutetium-177 [177Lu]-PSMA-617 nearly doubled median PSA progression-free survival (PFS) in men with progressive metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) compared with previous results with another radiopharmaceutical, radium-223 (Ra-223; Xofigo).

“In LuPSMA, the median PSA PFS was 7.6 months (95% CI, 6.3-9.0) and 27 (90%) of 30 men experienced PSA progression. The median overall survival (OS) was 13.5 months (95% CI, 10.4-22.7) and 22 (73%) men had died by the November 2017 data cutoff.”

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