Novel Radionuclide Treatment Demonstrates Promising Results in mCRPC

Excerpt:

“Updated results from the phase II LuPSMA study published in The Lancet Oncology showed radionuclide treatment with Lutetium-177 [177Lu]-PSMA-617 nearly doubled median PSA progression-free survival (PFS) in men with progressive metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) compared with previous results with another radiopharmaceutical, radium-223 (Ra-223; Xofigo).

“In LuPSMA, the median PSA PFS was 7.6 months (95% CI, 6.3-9.0) and 27 (90%) of 30 men experienced PSA progression. The median overall survival (OS) was 13.5 months (95% CI, 10.4-22.7) and 22 (73%) men had died by the November 2017 data cutoff.”

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Getting Off Biopsy Train in Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

Freddie Hamdy, MBChB, a leading prostate cancer researcher and head of urology at University of Oxford, blew my mind when I spoke with him the other day.

“He told me we are on the cusp of a revolution in active surveillance (AS) for prostate cancer — one that will in effect ‘cure’ my cancer with a swipe of a pen as cancer will be redefined.

“A prostate cancer diagnosis with a low-risk Gleason 6 changed my life in December 2010. My first urologist offered to rush me to the OR. I declined and got a second opinion. Instead, I opted for AS and have been on it ever since.”

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Low-Dose Abiraterone With Food vs Standard-Dose Abiraterone in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“In a phase II trial reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Szmulewitz et al found that low-dose abiraterone (Zytiga) given with a low-fat meal was noninferior to standard-dose abiraterone in the fasting state with regard to reduction in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels among patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.”

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How to Fight Side Effects of Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Men on hormone therapy for prostate cancer may benefit significantly from hitting the gym with fellow patients and choosing more veggies and fewer cheeseburgers, a new study suggests.

“Androgen deprivation therapy is a powerful tool against prostate cancer, and more and more men are opting for the treatment as a growing array of hormone-based therapies become available.

“But it comes with a cost. Suppressing male hormones, including testosterone, that fuel cancer growth also means that patients lose strength and muscle mass and gain fat. And that puts the men at risk for other health problems, including heart disease and diabetes.”

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Taking a Standard Prostate Cancer Drug with Food Boosts Impact, Lowers Cost

Excerpt:

“By taking a high-cost drug with a low-fat meal — instead of on an empty stomach, as prescribed — prostate cancer patients could decrease their daily dose, prevent digestive issues and cut costs by 75 percent, according to a new study in the March 28, 2018, issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO).

“Abiraterone acetate, marketed as Zytiga®, is the standard medicine used to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Patients taking Zytiga are told to take four of the 250 milligram pills first thing in the morning. Then, having gone without food overnight, they must wait at least one more hour before eating breakfast.”

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Massive Bio Aims to Improve Clinical Trial Enrollment Rates With Oncology Registry, Matching Tool

Excerpt:

“Healthcare informatics firm Massive Bio has enrolled its first patient in a global registry it launched as part of a new clinical trial matching system that seeks to connect patients to appropriate biomarker-based clinical trials using information such as clinical history and genomic testing results.

“Previously, Massive Bio offered its clinical trial matching capability as part of a broader oncology clinical decision support system through which it provides treatment guidance and expert recommendations primarily to oncologists working in community practices. By separating the clinical trial matching component, the company hopes to broaden its market reach, said Massive Bio CEO and Cofounder Selin Kurnaz. The company also hopes the new tool will appeal to contract research organizations, molecular diagnostics companies, and patients themselves.”

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Why Can’t Dying Patients Get the Drugs They Want?

Excerpt:

“At first glance, a bill passed by the House of Representatives this week seems like the kind of thing anyone could get behind.

“Known as the “Right to Try” legislation, it would allow terminally ill patients access to experimental drugs without the approval of the Food and Drug Administration.

“But the bill and a similar one passed last summer by the Senate do little to address the main barrier that patients face in getting unapproved treatments: permission from the drug companies themselves.”

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Xtandi Granted Priority Review for Prostate Cancer Treatment

Excerpt:

“The Food and Drug Administration granted Xtandi (enzalutamide) a priority review to a supplemental new drug application for the treatment of patients with nonmetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, according to the companies developing the drug, Pfizer and Astellas.

“The sNDA is based on data from the phase 3 PROSPER trial in which the combination of Xtandi and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) reduced the risk of metastases or death by 71 percent compared with ADT alone for patients with nonmetastatic CRPC. In the double-blind study, the median metastasis-free survival (MFS) was 36.6 months with Xtandi plus ADT versus 14.7 months with ADT alone.”

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Researchers Create a Drug to Extend the Lives of Men with Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Fifteen years ago, Michael Jung was already an eminent scientist when his wife asked him a question that would change his career, and extend the lives of many men with a particularly lethal form of prostate cancer.

” ‘When I turned 55—I’m now 70—my wife, Alice, said to me, “What do you want to do for the rest of your life, more of the same?” ‘ recalled Jung, a UCLA distinguished professor of chemistry and biochemistry. ‘I said that didn’t sound like such a bad idea until you put it that way.’ ”

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