Abiraterone/ADT Combo Increased Prostate Cancer Survival

Excerpt:

“Combined therapy with abiraterone acetate/prednisone plus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) significantly improved overall survival and radiographic progression-free survival (PFS) among men with metastatic hormone-naive prostate cancer compared with ADT and placebo alone, according to the results of the phase III LATITUDE trial (abstract LBA3) presented at the 2017 ASCO Annual Meeting.

” ‘In my opinion, these findings support the fact that adding abiraterone and prednisone to castration should now be considered the new standard of care for men with newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer,’ said researcher Karim Fizazi, MD, PhD, head of the department of cancer medicine at Gustave Roussy, University Paris-Sud, Villejuif, France.”

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First Clinical Trial of New Targeted Molecular Therapy in U.S. Takes Aim at Incurable Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“NewYork-Presbyterian and Weill Cornell Medicine have begun the first clinical trial in the United States that uses a small molecule to treat men with progressive prostate cancer that has spread beyond the prostate and is no longer responding to hormonal therapy. The Phase 1 study has completed its second round of patient enrollment, with the first six patients having undergone dosing. The researchers will be discussing the trial on June 5 at the 2017 American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago.

“The researchers are using the small molecule Lutetium 177Lu-PSMA-617 to target prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), a protein that is abundantly expressed in 85-90 percent of metastasized prostate cancers. The small molecule binds to PSMA and delivers precise radiation therapy intended to shrink the cancer — even in cases in which cells have yet to form a visible tumor on a bone or CT scan.”

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Combined Urine Test for T2:ERG, PCA3 Ups Prostate CA Detection

Excerpt:

“Testing for combined urinary PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG (T2:ERG) RNA can improve detection of prostate cancer, according to a study published online May 18 in JAMA Oncology.

“Martin G. Sanda, M.D., from the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, and colleagues conducted a multicenter diagnostic evaluation and validation in academic and community-based ambulatory urology clinics. A sample of men presenting for first-time without preexisting prostate cancer were enrolled: 516 in the developmental cohort and 561 in the validation cohort. Urinary PCA3 and T2:ERG RNA were measured before prostate biopsy.”

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New Blood Test Is More Accurate in Predicting Prostate Cancer Risk Than PSA

Excerpt:

“A team of researchers from Cleveland Clinic, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, and other clinical sites have demonstrated that a new blood test known as IsoPSA detects prostate cancer more precisely than current tests in two crucial measures — distinguishing cancer from benign conditions, and identifying patients with high-risk disease.

“By identifying molecular changes in the prostate specific antigen (PSA) protein, the findings, published online last month by European Urology, suggest that once validated, use of IsoPSA may substantially reduce the need for biopsy, and may thus lower the likelihood of overdetection and overtreatment of nonlethal prostate cancer.”

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AUA: Prostate Cancer Studies Highlight DNA Repair Gene Involvement

Excerpt:

“Two new studies presented at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA) offer an improved understanding of some genetic underpinnings of prostate cancer. In one, researchers found that BRCA mutations may raise the risk of the malignancy substantially, while another found a high rate of mutations among other DNA repair genes as well.

” ‘These studies reveal new insights into the role genetic mutations play in the development of prostate cancer, particularly metastatic disease,’ said Scott Eggener, MD, of the University of Chicago Medicine, who moderated the session with these studies, in a press release.”

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Flu Vaccine in Lung Cancer Patients Could Increase Immunotherapy Toxicities

Excerpt:

“Seasonal influenza vaccination resulted in increased risk of immune-related adverse events (AEs) in lung cancer patients treated with PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors in a small study. However, the risks of the flu itself may still outweigh the risks associated with vaccination.

” ‘Use of immune checkpoint inhibitors is now standard clinical practice for many oncology patients, and these same patients—particularly those with lung cancer—also face increased risk for complications from influenza,’ said Sacha Rothschild, MD, PhD, of University Hospital Basel in Switzerland, in a press release. ‘Although routine influenza vaccination has long been recommended for cancer patients, there are concerns that it might trigger an exaggerated immune response in this subgroup receiving checkpoint inhibitors.’ ”

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Novel Blood Test May Identify New Biomarker in Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“By assessing plasma androgen receptor (AR) gene status assessment with multiplex droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), European researchers could predict which patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) were most likely to have poorer outcomes while undergoing targeted therapy, according to results from the PREMIER trial published in the Annals of Oncology.

“Researchers said there was a ‘significant association’ for AR gain and poorer overall survival (OS) for both chemotherapy-naïve patients (HR, 3.98; 95% CI, 1.75-9.10; P <.001) and patients previously treated with docetaxel (HR, 3.81; 95% CI, 2.28-6.37; P <.001). AR gain was also associated with poorer OS for chemotherapy-naïve patients treated with enzalutamide (Xtandi) or abiraterone acetate (Zytiga; HR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.08-4.39; P = .03) and for patients previously treated with docetaxel (HR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.23-3.11; P = .01).”

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Thousands of Men with Prostate Cancer Get Risky Treatment They Don’t Need. New Approaches Could Curb That

Excerpt:

“They look like glowing jade necklaces of such unearthly brilliance they could be a Ming emperor’s. But if Dr. Gerardo Fernandez is right, the green fluorescent images of prostate cells could be even more valuable, at least to the thousands of men every year who unnecessarily undergo aggressive treatment for prostate cancer.

“That’s because the glimmering images promise to show which prostate cancers are destined to remain harmless for the rest of a man’s life, and thus might spare many patients treatment that can cause impotence and incontinence.”

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Active Surveillance of Prostate Cancer Associated with Favorable Outcomes in Younger Men

Excerpt:

“Younger age was associated with lower risks for disease progression and biopsy-based Gleason score upgrades during active surveillance of low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer, according to a study published in Journal of Clinical Oncology.

” ‘The results of this study indicate that younger patients with low-risk prostate cancer experienced favorable outcomes when managed with active surveillance at nearly 5-year median follow-up,’ Michael Leapman, MD, assistant professor in the department of urology at Yale University School of Medicine, told HemOnc Today. ‘Younger patients have conventionally been counseled to receive definitive treatment, even in the setting of low-risk disease. This study is impactful as it may expand the use of surveillance, potentially limiting the harms of overtreatment for patients with screening-detected low-grade tumors.’ ”

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