Targeted Radionuclide Treatment for Neuroendocrine Tumors Improves Quality of Life

Excerpt:

“Malignant neuroendocrine tumors, commonly called NETs, are easy to miss and associated with discouraging survival rates and poor quality of life. A study presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) shows how a novel peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is significantly improving patient wellbeing.

“In the NETTER-1 Phase III Trial, a randomized prospective study, researchers focused on advanced midgut NETs and reviewed patient-reported quality of life questionnaires following treatment with lutetium-177 (177Lu)-octreotate PRRT, also known as 177Lu-DOTATATE—brand name Lutathera. Treatment with Lutathera provided some relief for neuroendocrine cancer patients in the study when compared to high-dose octreotide, used as a control.”

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Personalized PRRT Improves Radiation Delivery to Neuroendocrine Tumors

Excerpt:

“Neuroendocrine cancer is exceedingly difficult to manage and unlikely to be cured, but researchers intend to slow progression of these tumors and aid survival by personalizing patient dose of peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), according to research presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI).

“PRRT has become a of choice for relatively rare and easy-to-overlook neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The targeted treatment is designed to home in on and attach to peptide-receptor positive tumors, while sparing tissues that might otherwise be damaged by systemic treatments. However, researchers are still perfecting the practice.”

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Long-Term Experience Supports Efficacy and Safety of PRRT for Treating Neuroendocrine Tumors

Excerpt:

“More than ten years of published clinical data and personal experience using PRRT-based targeted therapy of neuroendocrine tumors supports the effectiveness of this novel treatment approach and the ability to minimize and manage potential toxic side effects. A comprehensive review of somatostatin analog peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is published in Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals.”

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Excitement Continues to Build for Advances in Neuroendocrine Tumor Field

Excerpt:

“It’s been an exciting year thus far for patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), with the FDA approving a new treatment regimen and more advancements on the horizon, according to James C. Yao, MD, a professor in the Department of Gastrointestinal (GI) Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

“In February, the FDA approved everolimus (Afinitor) as a treatment for patients with progressive, well-differentiated, non-functional NETs of GI or lung origin with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic disease. The mTOR inhibitor has been approved since 2011 for unresectable or advanced pancreatic NETs.

“Meanwhile, the agency is evaluating Lutathera (177Lutetium DOTA-octreotate), a peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), for patients with gastroenteropancreatic NETs under its priority review program. Similarly, telotristat etiprate, a small-molecule tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, also is being considered under the FDA’s priority review program for carcinoid syndrome in patients with metastatic NETs.”

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Blood Test Predicts Success of Neuroendocrine Cancer Therapy

Excerpt:

“Malignant neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are relatively rare, notoriously difficult to treat, and associated with poor long-term survival. According to research presented at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI), an investigative blood test could predict how patients will respond to peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) before they commit to a course of treatment.

“Cancerous NETs can develop in a variety of places where hormone signaling occurs between nerve cells and organs of the endocrine system, but the most common origins of these tumors are in the gastrointestinal tract, the lungs and the pancreas. These cancers sneak up on oncologists due to their rarity and the fact that symptoms such as flushing, diarrhea and sweating are often regarded as unrelated to disease and part of normal life events. Most cases are not caught until these tumors have already spread to other organs, making them difficult to treat with conventional means. A targeted treatment established in the early 2000s called peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) zeros in on active peptide receptors that are over-expressed on the surface of NETs. The injected drug binds specifically to these receptors and knocks out tumors by irradiating them with a powerful dose of short-range radioactive material while sparing healthy tissues nearby.”

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Hormone-Mimicking Drugs Are Used To Treat Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (GEP-NETs)


Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can arise wherever neuroendocrine (hormone-producing) cells are found—which is in most organs. Most NETs (65%-70%) are gastroenteropancreatic, or GEP, arising in different gastrointestinal organs. GEP-NETs are most commonly found in the small bowel (including the appendix), stomach, and rectum. Still, NETs in general are rare, which complicates the development of new treatments and identification of the genetic drivers of these cancers. Treatment of GEP-NETs is clearly an unmet medical need, and is now even more urgent because their incidence has been on the rise in the last 20 years. Continue reading…