Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Tied to Depression

Excerpt:

“Hormone therapy for prostate cancer may increase the risk for depression, a new analysis has found.

“Hormone therapy, or androgen deprivation therapy, a widely used prostate cancer treatment, aims to reduce levels of testosterone and other male hormones, which helps limit the spread of prostate cancer cells.

“From 1992 to 2006, researchers studied 78,552 prostate cancer patients older than 65, of whom 33,382 had hormone therapy.”

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Study Supports Early Intervention for Prostate Cancer Patients Who Experience Significant Emotional Distress

“A study led by the University at Buffalo and Roswell Park Cancer Institute has identified beliefs and personality traits that are associated with higher levels of distress in newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients.

“The findings support the value of emotional and informational support for patients and perhaps early counseling for some who are the most distressed.

“Factors that were associated with greater distress included a lack of confidence in deciding how to treat the cancer, being concerned that the cancer will progress, feeling that one’s masculinity was under threat and tendencies to be less optimistic and resilient.

“The study, ‘Factors Associated with Emotional Distress in Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer Patients,’ was first published online in Psycho-Oncology in January 2015. The results are from a larger longitudinal study of prostate cancer patients, ‘Live Well Live Long!’ The research was based on assessments of 1,425 men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer at five different centers.”


Women with Breast Cancer Demonstrate Elevated Long-Term Risk for Depression

“Women with breast cancer demonstrate increased risk for depression several years after diagnosis, according to study results.

“Nis P. Suppli, MD, of the Danish Cancer Society Research Center in Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues used Danish national registries to obtain data on nearly 2 million women who had no diagnosis of cancer and no major psychiatric disorder.

“Researchers followed the cohort from 1998 to 2011 and tracked incidence of breast cancer diagnoses. They also monitored for two outcome measures, first hospital contact for depression and redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants.

“Suppli and colleagues identified 44,494 women diagnosed with breast cancer during the study period.

“During the first year after diagnosis, the rate ratio for first hospital contact for depression was 1.7 (95% CI, 1.41-2.05), and the ratio remained significantly elevated after 3 years of diagnosis. The rate ratio for redemption of prescriptions for antidepressants was 3.09 (95% CI, 2.95-3.22), and the ratio remained significantly elevated 8 years after diagnosis.”


Three-Quarters of Depressed Cancer Patients do not Receive Treatment for Depression; New Approach Could Transform Care

“Three papers published in The Lancet Psychiatry, The Lancet, and The Lancet Oncology reveal that around three-quarters of cancer patients who have major depression are not currently receiving treatment for depression, and that a new integrated treatment program is strikingly more effective at reducing depression and improving quality of life than current care.

“An analysis of data from more than 21,000 patients attending cancer clinics in Scotland, UK, published in The Lancet Psychiatry, found that major depression is substantially more common in cancer patients than in the general population. Major depression was most common in patients with lung cancer (13%) and lowest in those with genitourinary cancer (6%). Moreover, nearly three quarters (73%) of depressed cancer patients were not receiving treatment.

“To address the problem of inadequate treatment the SMaRT Oncology-2 randomised trial, published in The Lancet, evaluated the effectiveness of a new treatment program called ‘Depression Care for People with Cancer’ (DCPC). DCPC is delivered by a team of specially trained cancer nurses and psychiatrists, working in collaboration with the patient’s cancer team and general practitioner, and is given as part of cancer care. It is a systematic treatment program that includes both antidepressants and psychological therapy.”


Unique Psychology Service Helps People with Cancer

“Not everyone with cancer can be a media hero battling the odds with a feisty survival story, says a Massey researcher. Dr Colette Nixon studied the impact of therapy provided by a unique Massey University-led psychology service for cancer patients in the Manawatü region.

“Despite numerous campaigns and positive stories in the media about cancer survivors, for many the word ‘cancer’ means death and loss, says Dr Nixon, a clinical psychology doctoral graduate. The psychological and emotional impact of this has only recently begun to be recognised, she says.”


Unique Psychology Service Helps People with Cancer

“Not everyone with cancer can be a media hero battling the odds with a feisty survival story, says a Massey researcher. Dr Colette Nixon studied the impact of therapy provided by a unique Massey University-led psychology service for cancer patients in the Manawatü region.

“Despite numerous campaigns and positive stories in the media about cancer survivors, for many the word ‘cancer’ means death and loss, says Dr Nixon, a clinical psychology doctoral graduate. The psychological and emotional impact of this has only recently begun to be recognised, she says.”


Unique Psychology Service Helps People with Cancer

“Not everyone with cancer can be a media hero battling the odds with a feisty survival story, says a Massey researcher. Dr Colette Nixon studied the impact of therapy provided by a unique Massey University-led psychology service for cancer patients in the Manawatü region.

“Despite numerous campaigns and positive stories in the media about cancer survivors, for many the word ‘cancer’ means death and loss, says Dr Nixon, a clinical psychology doctoral graduate. The psychological and emotional impact of this has only recently begun to be recognised, she says.”


Depression and Cancer: 10 Things You Should Know

“At first glance, the connection between a cancer diagnosis and depression might seem to be an obvious one. However, in patients battling this life-threatening disease, depression can have a serious impact, and even worsen the odds of survival. While the best approach to interrupting this vicious cycle is not fully understood, clinicians can help patients improve their odds by availing them of therapeutic resources and open communication.”


Depression and Cancer: 10 Things You Should Know

“At first glance, the connection between a cancer diagnosis and depression might seem to be an obvious one. However, in patients battling this life-threatening disease, depression can have a serious impact, and even worsen the odds of survival. While the best approach to interrupting this vicious cycle is not fully understood, clinicians can help patients improve their odds by availing them of therapeutic resources and open communication.”