HR-Positive Breast Cancer Patients May Have More Anxiety

“Women with hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer may be more scared, anxious, or concerned about treatment-related adverse events and cancer symptoms compared with their counterparts with HR-negative disease, according to the results of a survey conducted by Marc Citron, MD, of ProHEALTH Care Associates, Lake Success, New York, and colleagues.

“According to Citron, this increased anxiety may ‘stem from differences in disease characteristics between HR-positive and HR-negative/unknown patients.’

“Citron presented the results of the survey at the poster session at the 32nd Annual Miami Breast Cancer Conference, held February 26-28.

“According to the poster, the 2013 Global Count Us, Know Us, Join Us, survey found that more than half of US women with metastatic breast cancer would like to have more time to discuss their needs during clinic visits, and 60% believe their cancer treatment options are limited. Therefore, Citron and colleagues wanted to examine what, if any, unmet emotional, communication, and care needs women with metastatic breast cancer had, and compare results among women with HR-positive and HR-negative disease.”


Women with Breast Cancer Demonstrate Elevated Long-Term Risk for Depression

“Women with breast cancer demonstrate increased risk for depression several years after diagnosis, according to study results.

“Nis P. Suppli, MD, of the Danish Cancer Society Research Center in Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues used Danish national registries to obtain data on nearly 2 million women who had no diagnosis of cancer and no major psychiatric disorder.

“Researchers followed the cohort from 1998 to 2011 and tracked incidence of breast cancer diagnoses. They also monitored for two outcome measures, first hospital contact for depression and redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants.

“Suppli and colleagues identified 44,494 women diagnosed with breast cancer during the study period.

“During the first year after diagnosis, the rate ratio for first hospital contact for depression was 1.7 (95% CI, 1.41-2.05), and the ratio remained significantly elevated after 3 years of diagnosis. The rate ratio for redemption of prescriptions for antidepressants was 3.09 (95% CI, 2.95-3.22), and the ratio remained significantly elevated 8 years after diagnosis.”


What Cancer Costs You Later: $4,000 a Year

“Having cancer is bad enough. And the lifetime consequences have been well-documented — a higher risk of other cancers, heart disease and general weakness from the treatment.

“Now a new federal study shows there’s a financial burden too — on average, $4,000 a year for men and $3,000 for women over and above what people who haven’t had cancer spend.

“And that’s just direct medical costs. Cancer survivors also have thousands in lost productivity, from having to cut work hours or even quit their jobs, the report finds.”


What Cancer Costs You Later: $4,000 a Year

“Having cancer is bad enough. And the lifetime consequences have been well-documented — a higher risk of other cancers, heart disease and general weakness from the treatment.

“Now a new federal study shows there’s a financial burden too — on average, $4,000 a year for men and $3,000 for women over and above what people who haven’t had cancer spend.

“And that’s just direct medical costs. Cancer survivors also have thousands in lost productivity, from having to cut work hours or even quit their jobs, the report finds.”


What Cancer Costs You Later: $4,000 a Year

“Having cancer is bad enough. And the lifetime consequences have been well-documented — a higher risk of other cancers, heart disease and general weakness from the treatment.

“Now a new federal study shows there’s a financial burden too — on average, $4,000 a year for men and $3,000 for women over and above what people who haven’t had cancer spend.

“And that’s just direct medical costs. Cancer survivors also have thousands in lost productivity, from having to cut work hours or even quit their jobs, the report finds.”


Unique Psychology Service Helps People with Cancer

“Not everyone with cancer can be a media hero battling the odds with a feisty survival story, says a Massey researcher. Dr Colette Nixon studied the impact of therapy provided by a unique Massey University-led psychology service for cancer patients in the Manawatü region.

“Despite numerous campaigns and positive stories in the media about cancer survivors, for many the word ‘cancer’ means death and loss, says Dr Nixon, a clinical psychology doctoral graduate. The psychological and emotional impact of this has only recently begun to be recognised, she says.”


Unique Psychology Service Helps People with Cancer

“Not everyone with cancer can be a media hero battling the odds with a feisty survival story, says a Massey researcher. Dr Colette Nixon studied the impact of therapy provided by a unique Massey University-led psychology service for cancer patients in the Manawatü region.

“Despite numerous campaigns and positive stories in the media about cancer survivors, for many the word ‘cancer’ means death and loss, says Dr Nixon, a clinical psychology doctoral graduate. The psychological and emotional impact of this has only recently begun to be recognised, she says.”


Unique Psychology Service Helps People with Cancer

“Not everyone with cancer can be a media hero battling the odds with a feisty survival story, says a Massey researcher. Dr Colette Nixon studied the impact of therapy provided by a unique Massey University-led psychology service for cancer patients in the Manawatü region.

“Despite numerous campaigns and positive stories in the media about cancer survivors, for many the word ‘cancer’ means death and loss, says Dr Nixon, a clinical psychology doctoral graduate. The psychological and emotional impact of this has only recently begun to be recognised, she says.”


Depression and Cancer: 10 Things You Should Know

“At first glance, the connection between a cancer diagnosis and depression might seem to be an obvious one. However, in patients battling this life-threatening disease, depression can have a serious impact, and even worsen the odds of survival. While the best approach to interrupting this vicious cycle is not fully understood, clinicians can help patients improve their odds by availing them of therapeutic resources and open communication.”