Benefit of Radiation Boost in DCIS Validated

Excerpt:

“A radiation boost to the tumor bed led to a small but statistically significant reduction in breast cancer recurrence after breast-conserving therapy for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a randomized study showed.

“Women who received the radiation boost had a 15-year freedom from ipsilateral recurrence of 91.6% compared with 88.0% for patients who had lumpectomy and adjuvant irradiation but not boost to the tumor bed. The additional protection afforded by the radiation boost encompassed both DCIS and invasive recurrence.”

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Intermediate Risk Prostate Cancer May Be Well Controlled with Brachytherapy Alone

Excerpt:

“For men with intermediate risk prostate cancer, radiation treatment with brachytherapy alone can result in similar cancer control with fewer long-term side effects, when compared to more aggressive treatment that combines brachytherapy with external beam therapy (EBT), according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).”

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Immune and Targeted Therapies Combined with Radiation Therapy Improves Outcomes for Melanoma Brain Metastases Patients, Say Moffitt Researchers

Excerpt:

“Brain metastases are one of the most common complications of advanced melanoma, requiring multidisciplinary management. Patients who are diagnosed with these metastases have an expected median survival of only 4 to 5 months. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers hope to improve these survival rates following a new study in Annals of Oncology that shows novel immune and targeted therapies with radiation therapy improves the outcomes of patients with melanoma brain metastases over conventional chemotherapy.”

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Hypofractionation May Be Poised to Become New Standard of Care for Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“There has been an ongoing debate about which type of radiation therapy is preferable in the treatment of localized prostate cancer: hypofractionation (larger fractions given over 4–5 weeks) or conventional radiotherapy (given over 8–9 weeks). A new study presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting may help to resolve that debate.

“The large, randomized trial found that hypofractionation was not inferior to conventional radiation therapy in terms of efficacy or safety in men with localized intermediate-risk prostate cancer. This is the third large, randomized, contemporary study to demonstrate that both techniques have equivalent efficacy and safety.”

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Radiation Plus ADT Boosts Survival in Metastatic Prostate Ca (CME/CE)

Excerpt:

“A large contemporary analysis of men with metastatic prostate cancer has found that adding radiotherapy to androgen deprivation therapy resulted in substantially better survival than androgen deprivation alone.

“With a median follow-up of 5.1 years, giving prostate radiotherapy plus androgen deprivation was associated on univariate analysis with a longer median overall survival of 53 versus 29 months, for a hazard ratio of 0.562 (95% CI 0.498-0.635, P0.001). The effect held in multivariate, propensity score, and landmark analyses — with the last yielding improved overall survival estimates at 3, 5, and 8 years, reported Chad. G. Rusthoven, MD, of University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, and colleagues in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“The estimates were 62% versus 43% for 3 years, 49% versus 25% for 5 years, and 33% versus 13% for 8 years (HR 0.562, 95% CI 0.498-0.635, P0.001).”

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Shorter Radiation Course Recommended for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients

Excerpt:

“Early-stage breast cancer patients receiving a shorter course of whole breast radiation with higher radiation doses per fraction reported equivalent cosmetic, functional and pain outcomes over time as those receiving a longer, lower-dose per fraction course of treatment, according to researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

“Their study, published in Cancer, found patient-reported functional status and breast pain improved significantly following both radiation schedules, and there were no significant differences in physician-reported cosmetic evaluations. With a more convenient treatment schedule and equivalent outcomes, the authors suggest the shorter course as the preferred option for patients.”

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Second-Generation AR-Targeting Agent Explored in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Researchers are hoping the results of a late-stage efficacy and safety study of apalutamide (ARN-509) in patients with high-risk, localized, or locally advanced prostate cancer who are receiving primary radiation therapy will demonstrate an improvement in metastasis-free survival, according to global principal investigator, Howard M. Sandler, MD.

“ ‘The patient population that we’re studying are men who are at risk of dying of prostate cancer,’ Sandler, chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, told OncologyLive. ‘If we can provide better upfront disease control, we’re hoping to reduce the number of men who enter into the castrate-resistant prostate cancer stage.’ “

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Total Body Irradiation Did Not Improve Response of Adoptive Cell Transfer

Excerpt:

“Adding total body irradiation to preparative lymphodepletion chemotherapy prior to the adoptive cell transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) had no effect on tumor regression in patients with metastatic melanoma, according to the results of a study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“However, adoptive cell transfer of TILs did mediate the objective complete response of 24% of patients.

“ ‘The nonmyeloablative chemotherapy regimen thus seemed to provide sufficient lymphodepletion for successful adoptive transfer without the need to add total body irradiation,’ wrote researchers led by Stephanie L. Goff, MD, of the National Cancer Institute.”

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French Trial Shows Benefit of Adding Short-Term Hormone Therapy to Salvage Radiotherapy for Rising PSA After Prostatectomy

Excerpt:

“In the phase III GETUG-AFU 16 trial reported in The Lancet Oncology, Carrie et al found that adding short-term androgen suppression therapy to salvage radiotherapy was associated with improved biochemical or clinical progression-free survival among patients with prostate cancer who exhibited rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after radical prostatectomy.

“In the open-label trial, 743 patients from 43 sites were randomized between October 2006 and March 2010 to receive radiotherapy alone (n = 374) or with goserelin (Zoladex; n = 369). Patients had received no previous androgen-deprivation therapy or pelvic radiotherapy and had a rising PSA level of 0.2 to < 2.0 μg/L after having a level < 0.1 μg/L for at least 6 months after surgery with no evidence of clinical disease.

“Treatment consisted of three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy at 66 Gy in 33 fractions 5 days per week for 7 weeks or radiotherapy plus 10.8 mg of goserelin by subcutaneous injection on the first day of radiotherapy and 3 months later. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival in the intention-to-treat population.”

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