Radiation-Immunotherapy Combination Can Slow Tumor Growth for Some Patients With Metastatic Late-Stage Cancer

Excerpt:

“A new study involving patients with stage IV cancer finds that treatment with radiation therapy and immunotherapy can halt the growth of tumors by stimulating the body’s immune system to attack the cancer. In the phase II trial, patients with end-stage cancer that had spread to the lungs or liver demonstrated a favorable response to the combined treatment. Between 30 and 60 percent of the patients, depending on the treatment arm, found that their cancer stopped spreading. Findings will be presented today at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).”

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Long-Term Survival Rates More Than Double Previous Estimates for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Long-term results of a phase III clinical trial indicate that survival rates for patients receiving chemoradiation for unresectable, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may be more than twice as high as previous estimates. At five years following treatment with a standard dose of 60 Gray (Gy) radiation delivered in 30 fractions, the overall survival rate was 32 percent, setting a new benchmark of survival for patients with inoperable stage III NSCLC. The trial, RTOG 0617, also confirms that a standard dose of radiation therapy is preferable to a higher dose and that cetuximab offers no additional survival benefit for these patients. Findings will be presented today at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) in San Diego.”

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Targeted Radiotherapy Limits Side Effects of Breast Cancer Treatment

Excerpt:

“Breast cancer patients who have radiotherapy targeted at the original tumour site experience fewer side effects five years after treatment than those who have whole breast radiotherapy, and their cancer is just as unlikely to return, according to trial results published* in The Lancet (link is external) today (Wednesday).

“The Cancer Research UK-funded IMPORT LOW trial** revealed that five years after treatment, almost all patients were disease free.***

“The researchers at 30 radiotherapy centres across the UK, led by The Institute of Cancer Research, London(link is external), and the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Centre(link is external), studied more than 2,000 women aged 50 or over who had early stage breast cancer that was at a low risk of coming back.”

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Proton Tx Plus Chemo Seen Beneficial in NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The use of proton beam radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy may improve clinical outcomes for patients with inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), while reducing the toxic effects of treatment, researchers from MD Anderson Cancer Center have found.

“The researchers, led by Joe Y. Chang, MD, PhD, reported that the median overall survival of 26.5 months observed in their study ‘was encouraging, and in accord with our original statistical goal of 24 months.’ ”

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Brain Cancer Like McCain’s Has Hundreds Of Experimental Therapies (With Little Success)

Excerpt:

“The type of brain cancer John McCain was diagnosed with July 14, glioblastoma, is among the most difficult cancers to beat. The reasons it’s so hard to treat, as I discussed previously, include its location, its genetic diversity within and across patients, and its aggressiveness. Glioblastoma (GBM) is also among the most devastating cancers in its effects since it attacks the brain, the control center for the body’s functions and the essence of an individual’s personality. Even people who survive rarely remain the same person after their treatment.”

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Radiation Prior to Surgery Reduces Risk of Secondary Tumors in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Moffitt Cancer Center researchers launched a first of its kind study comparing the long-term benefits of radiation therapy in women with breast cancer either before surgery (neoadjuvant) or after surgery (adjuvant). Their study, published in the June 30 issue of Breast Cancer Research, found that patients who have neoadjuvant radiation therapy have a significantly lower risk of developing a second primary tumor at any site.

“The majority of patients who have early stage breast cancer have surgery to remove their tumor or a complete mastectomy. Surgery is commonly followed by radiation therapy, which has been shown to increase relapse-free survival. However, in some cases, patients may require neoadjuvant radiation therapy to decrease the size of the tumor before surgery. Currently, there are no studies that have analyzed the long-term effects of neoadjuvant radiation therapy on breast cancer patients.”

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Men Have Regret Years after Prostate Cancer Treatment

Excerpt:

“After years of introspection, about 15% of men with localized prostate cancer regretted the decisions they made regarding treatment, a survey of almost 1,000 patients showed.

“About twice as many men expressed regret after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy as compared with active surveillance. The single biggest contributor to regret was treatment-associated sexual dysfunction, as reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.”

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Proton-Beam Therapy in Limited-Stage SCLC Shows Promising Efficacy

Excerpt:

“Proton-beam therapy (PBT) was found to be safe for patients with limited-stage (LS) small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in the first prospective registry study of the therapy, with only a small number of high-grade toxicities.

” ‘Radiation therapy is essential for the management of limited-stage SCLC,’ wrote study authors led by Jean-Claude M. Rwigema, MD, of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. ‘When it is given with concurrent chemotherapy, radiation therapy can result in substantial toxicities.’ PBT can reduce the exposure to nearby organs at risk in non–small-cell lung cancer, and is under substantial investigation in that setting; before the new study, though, only a six-patient case series had examined its use in SCLC.”

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“Trojan Horse” Tested in EGFR-Amplified Glioblastoma

Excerpt:

“Investigators are seeking to determine whether the addition of ABT-414, an antibody–drug conjugate, to concomitant radiotherapy and temozolomide will improve the survival of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification.

“The phase IIb/III Intellance1 trial (NCT02573324), which is currently recruiting participants, seeks to randomize approximately 720 patients to a 2-phase experimental arm with ABT-414 or to a placebo comparator arm. Participants in the experimental arm will receive intravenous ABT-414 combined with standard therapy of oral temozolomide and radiation in a chemoradiation treatment phase, followed by ABT-414 plus oral temozolomide during an adjuvant treatment phase. The comparator arm will follow the same regimens, with an intravenous placebo to replace ABT-414.”

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