Second Course of Radium-223 Demonstrates Promising Results in mCRPC

Excerpt:

“According to results of a phase I/II study, men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who received a second course of radium-223 (Xofigo) experienced minimal hematologic toxicity and low radiographic bone progression rates.

“In the study, 29 of 44 patients (66%) received the full course of 6 injections. Median time to total alkaline phosphatase was not reached. Median time to PSA progression was 2.2 months.”

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Higano Discusses the Potential for PARP Inhibitors in Prostate Cancer Treatment

Excerpt:

“The field of prostate cancer is rapidly progressing on several different fronts, says Celestia Higano, MD, who discussed several of the the latest advances at the 2017 Interdisciplinary Prostate Cancer Congress (IPCC).

” ‘I want the community to have a sense of the very rapid change of pace of prostate cancer therapy. I hope to spread the message of what is changing, why is it is changing, what has been shown in evidence-based therapies, and what is still experimental,’ said Higano, MD, professor of medicine and urology at the University of Washington, and a member of the Clinical Research Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.”

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Expert Discusses State of Immunotherapy in Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Advancements in immunotherapy in the field of prostate cancer have been slow ever since the FDA approval of sipuleucel-T (Provenge) several years ago.

” ‘It’s an exceptionally challenging area. After the success of sipuleucel-T, there have been combinatorial approaches using radiopharmaceuticals, such as radium-223, the checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab (Yervoy), as well as some chemotherapy regimens,’ says Susan F. Slovin, MD, PhD.

“In an interview with OncLive at the 2017 Interdisciplinary Prostate Cancer Congress, Slovin, a medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, offered her expert insight on the current state of immunotherapy in prostate cancer.”

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Optimizing Treatment With Radium-223 for Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“As oncologists await future treatment advances in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), the key is to unleash the full potential of available therapies, Robert Dreicer, MD, asserted during the 2016 CFS Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium.

“One agent that oncologist are focused on optimizing, Dreicer said, is radium-223 (Xofigo). Optimal use of this treatment remains mostly unknown, with current efforts focusing on exploring the agent’s potential in combination regimens.

“For instance, a phase III trial is randomizing patients with bone predominant mCRPC to radium-223 plus abiraterone acetate (Zytiga) or abiraterone alone (NCT02043678). Additionally, a randomized phase IIa study is evaluating the efficacy and safety of radium-223 in combination with abiraterone or enzalutamide (Xtandi) in patients with mCRPC to investigate bone-scan response, radiological progression-free survival, overall survival, and skeletal events (NCT02034552).”

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Adding Bone Drugs to Radium-223 May Enhance Benefit in mCRPC

Excerpt:

“Men with bone-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) appeared to derive additional benefits from treatment with radium-223 with concomitant bone-targeted therapies, according to data from an extended-access program.

“After a median follow-up of 7.5 months from initial injection of radium-223, patients on concomitant denosumab had yet to reach a median overall survival (OS), whereas patients treated with radium-223 alone had a median survival of 13.4 months.”

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Video: An Overview of the ALSYMPCA Study in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Luke Nordquist, MD, FACP, a urologic medical oncologist and CEO of the Urology Cancer Center and GU Research Network, gives an overview of the Alpharadin in Symptomatic Prostate Cancer Patients (ALSYMPCA) study, and he discusses ongoing trials examining the use of radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).”

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Safety, Survival Advantages of Radium-223 Continue to Offer Benefit in mCRPC

Excerpt:

“The manageable safety profile of radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo) compared with other radiopharmaceuticals is appealing to oncologists treating castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) that is metastatic to the bone, says Richard G. Stock, MD.

“ ‘With previous radiopharmaceuticals, there has been a limitation with bone marrow toxicity,’ said Stock, senior faculty, Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Hospital. ‘Radium-223 really spares the bone marrow to a much greater degree than prior treatments, and that is why it has been embraced and much more widely utilized than any of the other radiopharmaceuticals.’ ”

“The FDA approved radium-223 in May 2013 based on findings from the phase III ALSYMPCA trial. In the study, radium-223 demonstrated a median overall survival of 14.9 months compared with 11.3 months with placebo for patients with bone-metastatic CRPC (HR, 0.70; P <.001).”

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Retreatment With Radium-223 Found Safe in mCRPC

Excerpt:

“To determine if a higher dose of radium-223 would be safe, an international, multicenter, prospective study examined 44 patients with mCRPC with bone metastases. Radium-223 was found to be well tolerated in this study, with incidence of adverse advents in retreated patients comparable or lower than those seen in the ALSYMPCA trial. No new safety concerns were observed with the higher dose.

“In an interview with OncLive, Nordquist, an investigator on the trial, provides more insight on the study and the ongoing potential of radium-223 in mCRPC.”

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Expert Says Xofigo Is "Game Changer" for Bone Metastatic CRPC

Excerpt:

“Radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo) opened an entirely new chapter in the treatment landscape of castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases (mCRPC), says E. David Crawford, MD, professor of Radiation Oncology, Department of Surgery, at the University of Colorado Denver.

“ ‘Radium-223 is sort of a surprise drug, at least to me,’ says Crawford. “We have had radioisotopes around for a long period of time, including phosphorus-32, samarium-153 (Quadramet), strontium-89 (Metastron), and others. But, they all had a lot of baggage with them, in terms of side effects.

” ‘Now, we have a new one—radium-223—which is not associated with the side effects that we were seeing with the other ones, but it is associated with an improvement in survival rate. It’s a game changer.’ ”

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