Novel Combination Study Planned for SCLC

Excerpt:

“A phase I/II study will explore the delta-like protein 3 (DLL3)-targeted antibody-drug conjugate rovalpituzumab tesirine (Rova-T) with the PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab (Opdivo) alone or in combination with the CTLA-4 inhibitor ipilimumab (Yervoy) for patients with relapsed extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC).

“AbbVie, the developer of rovalpituzumab tesirine, and Bristol-Myers Squibb, the company marketing nivolumab and ipilimumab announced the phase I/II study in a joint press release. As single-agents, rovalpituzumab tesirine and nivolumab have each demonstrated promising early findings for patients with SCLC. Additionally, nivolumab plus ipilimumab sparked promising response rates and overall survival (OS) findings. Data for the 3 agents were recently presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting.”

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Small Cell Lung Cancer at ASCO: Some Welcome News


Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a fatal disease that has not seen new drug approvals for the last 17 years. Considering the relative success of ‘immune checkpoint inhibitors’ in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), it is not surprising that several abstracts recently presented at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting were devoted to clinical trials testing these trendy, immune system-boosting drugs in people with SCLC. Continue reading…


After Promising Early Results, Drug to Continue Testing in More Relapsed SCLC Patients

The gist: In a clinical trial, a new drug called PM1183 showed promise for treating people with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Based on those results, the drug will be tested in more people in a new phase III clinical trial. PM1183 will be given to patients along with the drug doxorubicin. For comparison, some patients will only be treated with the drug topotecan. The trial will enroll patients who have SCLC that returned (relapsed) after standard treatment.

“Zeltia announces today that its pharmaceutical division PharmaMar will start a Phase III trial with PM1183 in combination with doxorubicin against topotecan in SCLC, given the activity observed in an interim analysis of an ongoing Phase Ib trial. The results of this study will be presented at a prominent international cancer meeting this year, which will be soon announced.

“Patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) after failure of standard chemotherapy, as well as bladder, gastric, breast, endometrial or ovarian cancer, neuroendocrine tumors and soft-tissue sarcomas were treated with the combination in a Phase I. The treatment showed efficacy across all cancer types, including several complete responses. This clinical response was remarkable in certain tumor types, particularly in SCLC, and consequently more patients with this type of tumor were enrolled. The treatment was generally well-tolerated, and these patients had marked objective tumor responses and were able to receive several cycles of treatment.

” ‘The data we have are very exciting as patients with SCLC have the worst prognosis among lung cancer patient. There have been no significant advances in 25 years in this type of lung cancer.’ says Luis Mora, Managing Director, PharmaMar.”


Chemo Combo Increases Survival, Toxicity in Sensitive Relapsed SCLC

“Cisplatin, etoposide, and irinotecan outperformed topotecan as second-line chemotherapy in patients with sensitive relapsed small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in a Japanese trial, though there was substantially increased toxicity with the regimen.

“ ‘Topotecan is the only drug approved in the United States and the European Union for relapsed SCLC,’ said Koichi Goto, MD, PhD, of the National Cancer Center Hospital East in Chiba, Japan. He presented results of the new trial at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago. Sensitive relapse refers to cancers that respond to initial chemotherapy and relapse more than 3 months after completion of that therapy, while refractory cancers do not respond initially or relapse within that 3 month window.”

Editor’s note: This story is about a clinical trial with volunteer patients to test a new treatment for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The new treatment is specifically for people with SCLC who were treated with chemotherapy successfully, but whose cancer returned more than 3 months after chemo—this is known as “sensitive relapsed SCLC.” The new treatment combines three chemo drugs: cisplatin, etoposide, and irinotecan. In the clinical trial, some patients took the chemo combo and some were treated with the chemo drug topotecan, which is a standard treatment for the condition. Patients who took the new treatment lived longer, but they had more toxic side effects than the patients who took topotecan.