Leading Cancer Organizations: Trump’s Proposed NIH Budget Cuts Will Threaten Research, Patient Care

Excerpt:

“Many of the nation’s leading research organizations and cancer centers have voiced their opposition to President Donald Trump’s proposed budget, which includes a $5.8 billion cut to NIH funding in 2018.

“The budget ‘blueprint’ — released Thursday — proposes $54 billion in cuts overall, including a 16.2% decrease, or $12.6 billion, for the Department of Health and Human Services.”

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ASCO Statement: President’s Budget Will Devastate U.S. Research Enterprise

Excerpt:

“ASCO President Daniel F. Hayes, MD, FACP, FASCO, released the following statement today:

” ‘We soundly oppose President Trump’s budget outline, which would cut $6 billion from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Reducing NIH’s funding by nearly 20% will devastate our nation’s already-fragile federal research infrastructure and undercut a longstanding commitment to biomedical science that has fueled advances in cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

” ‘When we are on the cusp of tremendous advances in cancer care, the United States can’t turn back the clock on research that will benefit millions of Americans with life-threatening diseases and their families. Gutting the U.S. research infrastructure won’t make America First, but will decidedly place the United States behind other countries in scientific advances. Failure to nurture the historic U.S. investment in research places health outcomes, scientific leadership, and economic growth at risk.’ ”

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AACR Strongly Opposes the Draconian Cuts to Medical Research Proposed in President Trump’s FY 2018 Budget

Excerpt:

“On behalf of the entire cancer research community, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) was shocked to learn that the Trump administration is proposing to cut $5.8 billion from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget in fiscal year (FY) 2018.  At a time when extraordinary progress is being made against cancer and many other diseases, these draconian cuts would set research back for decades and also threaten the careers of an entire generation of young investigators working in labs and clinics all over the country who are committed to improving public health and saving lives.”

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Genomics Has Potential to Transform Cancer Medicine

Genomics, the study of study of an organism’s entire genetic material, has profoundly affected medical research, including cancer research. In a recent interview, Eric Lander, one of the leaders of the Human Genome Project, reflects on the promising treatments emerging from genomics research, such as targeted cancer therapies. He stresses that these treatments only represent only a small, early inkling of genomics’ full potential. Cheaper, faster DNA sequencing has advanced the field from taking 15 years to decode a single person’s genome to comparing the genetic code of thousands of humans to detect which genes are altered in cancer and other diseases. Drug resistance to targeted therapies may be overcome via multi-drug combinations, Landers suggests. He warns that cuts in research funding may significantly slow down the progress of genomics.


Research Achieves Significant Progress in the Fight Against Cancer

A report released by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) emphasizes the noteworthy progress made in the understanding and treatment of cancer in recent years. Cancer death rates have declined 21% among men and 12% among women since the 1990s. A better understanding of the genetic makeup of different cancers helps guide individualized treatment. Research has also yielded first-ever therapies for several treatment-resistant cancers. Targeted immunotherapy lets patients harness their own immune system to fight their cancer. However, due to a growing and aging population, new cancer cases in the U.S. are predicted to increase 40% by 2030. The report’s authors warn that stagnant funding in the wake of federal budget cuts could stall further advances in cancer research.


Research Achieves Significant Progress in the Fight Against Cancer

A report released by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) emphasizes the noteworthy progress made in the understanding and treatment of cancer in recent years. Cancer death rates have declined 21% among men and 12% among women since the 1990s. A better understanding of the genetic makeup of different cancers helps guide individualized treatment. Research has also yielded first-ever therapies for several treatment-resistant cancers. Targeted immunotherapy lets patients harness their own immune system to fight their cancer. However, due to a growing and aging population, new cancer cases in the U.S. are predicted to increase 40% by 2030. The report’s authors warn that stagnant funding in the wake of federal budget cuts could stall further advances in cancer research.


Research Achieves Significant Progress in the Fight Against Cancer

A report released by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) emphasizes the noteworthy progress made in the understanding and treatment of cancer in recent years. Cancer death rates have declined 21% among men and 12% among women since the 1990s. A better understanding of the genetic makeup of different cancers helps guide individualized treatment. Research has also yielded first-ever therapies for several treatment-resistant cancers. Targeted immunotherapy lets patients harness their own immune system to fight their cancer. However, due to a growing and aging population, new cancer cases in the U.S. are predicted to increase 40% by 2030. The report’s authors warn that stagnant funding in the wake of federal budget cuts could stall further advances in cancer research.


Cancer Experts Organization Decries Cuts in Biomedical Research Funding

Over 200 medical research advocacy organizations urged the U.S. Congress to invest in biomedical research during the Rally for Medical Research Hill Day. In a statement supporting the event, the president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) criticized cuts in federal funding for biomedical research. He referenced a recent survey showing that three-quarters of cancer researchers report that the current federal funding situation is negatively impacting their ability to conduct research, more than one-third have had to lay off skilled staff, and many young researchers are choosing to leave the field. These difficulties undermine the promise of recent scientific advances that would otherwise offer the prospect of significant progress against cancer.