Encouraging and Paying for Clinical Trials, Right to Try, and Expanded Access: Part Three

A Q&A with Mark Shapiro, PhD,Vice President of Clinical Development at xCures, Inc.Partner at Pharma Initiatives; mshapiro@xcures.com. This is the final installment in a three-part series in which Dr. Shapiro has shared his thoughts on the question below. Read part 1 and part 2.

Q: Treatment of Americans with advanced cancer is complex and challenging and can be very expensive. Many urge greater participation of such patients in clinical trials. In general, who pays the expenses of clinical trials? And, specifically, how are the costs for Right to Try and expanded-access approaches reimbursed?

A: In clinical research, agreements between the research sponsor and the treating institution define what aspects of a study protocol are charged as research or related administrative costs, and what items are considered standard-of-care; that is, eligible for billing to insurance. This is made by a coverage review at the institution. While the sponsors provide the study drug freely to the site and patients, they expect to receive valuable data in exchange. In expanded access, which is treatment rather than research—but stills follows a protocol approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)— sponsors pay the required administrative costs and the free provision of the investigational drug. The drugs are expensive, and the sponsor incurs additional compliance costs when they make an investigational drug available. So, expanded access is largely a charitable act on behalf of the sponsor. While there are regulations allowing sponsors to recoup their costs under expanded access, these are rarely used. Most sponsors, especially larger companies, deliberately plan for expanded access when planning manufacturing campaigns during oncology drug development. In fact, large sponsors report that they approve about 95% of the expanded-access requests that they receive. Continue reading…


Encouraging and Paying for Clinical Trials, Right to Try, and Expanded Access: Part Two

A Q&A with Mark Shapiro, PhD,Vice President of Clinical Development at xCures, Inc.Partner at Pharma Initiatives; mshapiro@xcures.com. Last week, Dr. Shapiro shared his initial thoughts on the question below. Today, he discusses issues of cost and equitable access to care.

Q: Treatment of Americans with advanced cancer is complex and challenging and can be very expensive. Many urge greater participation of such patients in clinical trials. In general, who pays the expenses of clinical trials? And, specifically, how are the costs for Right to Try and expanded-access approaches reimbursed?

A: In late-stage cancer care, treatment is very expensive. While there is a great deal of focus on the cost of the drugs, many other costs are involved, including the cost of care, the cost of the facility, and the cost of laboratory and other tests. When you add clinical research on top of care, there are additional tasks, but it is normally the research sponsor that pays for those administrative and research costs, which are incurred by physicians and the institutions conducting the clinical trial.

Insurance companies also pay for at least some of the associated costs of care. In fact, sponsors of cancer trials strive to design studies that follow existing standards of care to minimize the additional costs of non-standard procedures. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) specified that standard-of-care procedures delivered during a clinical trial could be charged to insurance for studies conducted under an Investigational New Drug application. Before the ACA, insurers in many states did not cover procedures performed when the patient was in a clinical trial, so the passage of the ACA can be credited with the increase of access to and enrollment in cancer clinical trials in the past few years. Patients also bear many of the costs of their cancer care, even when they are in clinical trials, because they are responsible for insurance copays and deductibles. Continue reading…


Encouraging and Paying for Clinical Trials, Right to Try, and Expanded Access: Part One

A Q&A with Mark Shapiro, PhD,Vice President of Clinical Development at xCures, Inc.Partner at Pharma Initiatives; mshapiro@xcures.com

Q: Treatment of Americans with advanced cancer is complex and challenging and can be very expensive. Many urge greater participation of such patients in clinical trials. In general, who pays the expenses of clinical trials? And, specifically, how are the costs for Right to Try and expanded-access approaches reimbursed?

A: Incorporating clinical research into the clinical care of cancer patients may provide more options, and better outcomes, but participation is quite low. In 2004, only about 3% of American cancer patients participated in clinical trials.

More recent data suggest that the number may now be about 5%, although it is lower for women, children, minorities, and patients in community settings. The low figure should be of concern for a couple of reasons. First, patients are the scarcest resource in cancer research. Low participation in clinical trials represents a lost opportunity to learn and improve care. If every patient were part of systematic research, we could greatly accelerate the pace of cancer research findings. Second, most cancer treatment guidelines recommend a clinical trial as the standard-of-care at some stage in the course of disease. So, with current levels of participation, as many as 95% of American cancer patients are NOT receiving standard-of-care treatment at some point in their care. This deficit is partially attributed to the presence of comorbidities or poor function. Recent research suggests that liberalizing inclusion and exclusion criteria in clinical trials could increase enrollment by about 45%. In the study of common cancers, enrollment of patients with solid tumors could be increased from about 7% to 11%. Continue reading…