Oncotype DX® Predicts 10-year Risk of Developing Metastatic Prostate Cancer in Low- and Intermediate-risk Patients

Excerpt:

“Genomic Health, Inc. (Nasdaq: GHDX) today announced the presentation of new results from a large multi-center validation study, which confirmed that the Oncotype DX® Genomic Prostate Score™ (GPS) is a strong independent predictor of metastases at 10 years in prostate cancer patients across all National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) clinical risk groups. The clinical validation study data were designated one of the ‘best posters’ (abstract #352) at the 32nd Annual European Association of Urology (EAU) Congress in London.”

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New Biomarker Identifies Eye Cancer Patients at High Risk for Metastasis

“A study by J. William Harbour, M.D., Associate Director for Basic Research and leader of the Eye Cancer Site Disease Group at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and colleagues, published today in Clinical Cancer Research, details the discovery of a biomarker that puts patients at a higher risk for metastasis of uveal melanoma.

“Among uveal melanomas categorized as class 1, those with high levels of the biomarker PRAME mRNA were more likely to metastasize than those with low levels of PRAME mRNA, indicating that patients with this biomarker be monitored more closely for metastatic disease.

“The estimated five-year rate of metastasis was 0 percent for PRAME mRNA–low class 1 uveal melanomas and 38 percent for PRAME mRNA–high class 1 uveal melanomas. This research builds upon Harbour’s identification of class 1 and 2 uveal melanomas in 2004.”


Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) Using Multicatheter Brachytherapy After Breast Conserving Surgery Is as Effective as Whole Breast Irradiation (WBI) for Low-Risk Patients

“For some early stage breast cancer patients, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using multicatheter brachytherapy following breast conserving surgery may be an excellent treatment option, as it has now been proven to be as effective as the current standard treatment – whole breast irradiation (WBI) – in local control, disease-free and overall survival rates, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology’s (ASTRO’s) 57th Annual Meeting.

“Breast cancer patients often receive radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery to help lower the chance that the cancer will recur or metastasize in the nearby lymph nodes. WBI using external beam radiation is a longstanding standard RT for breast cancer patients, during which the entire breast and often the surrounding chest area receives radiation for several weeks, followed by an extra boost of radiation to the area where the cancer was removed. Many women in the U.S. who are eligible for breast conserving surgery still choose to undergo mastectomy in the hopes that it will make subsequent WBI unnecessary, due largely to the long-duration of WBI and/or because of fears concerning the potential side effects of radiation to surrounding organs.”


New Test Measures Risk of Metastasis for Early-Stage Melanoma

The gist: A new test helps measure the risk of metastasis for early-stage melanoma patients. The test, called DecisionDx-Melanoma, is a molecular test that measures the activity of 28 genes. Based on the results of the test for a given patient, a doctor may make certain treatment suggestions for that patient.

“Because two-thirds of melanoma patients who die or experience metastatic disease are initially diagnosed with early-stage disease, it is important to determine risk for metastasis in patients with early-stage melanoma. About 75% of patients with melanoma have early disease (stage I or II) at diagnosis.

“A prognostic 28-gene signature (DecisionDx-Melanoma, Castle Biosciences) could predict which patients with stage I or II melanoma are at high risk for metastasis, and could alter the clinical management of these patients, according to a confirmatory study published in the January 1 issue of Clinical Cancer Research.

“The 28-gene signature predicts a patient’s risk for metastasis, independent of American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) melanoma staging, Breslow thickness, ulceration, mitotic rate, and age.”


Osteoporosis Treatment May Also Benefit Breast Cancer Patients

“Treatment approaches to reduce the risk of bone complications (metastasis) associated with breast cancer may be one step closer to becoming a reality. According to a study led by a team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC), findings show that medication used to treat bone deterioration in post-menopausal women may also slow skeletal metastasis caused from breast cancer. This study, published in this month’s issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI), is among the first to link bisphosphonate (a common osteoporosis medication) use with improved survival in women with breast cancer.

” ‘Skeletal metastases develop in up to 70 percent of women who die from breast cancer,’ says study co-lead author, Dr. Richard Kremer, director of the Bone and Mineral Unit at the MUHC and a professor in the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University. ‘This causes considerable suffering and is life-threatening. Preventing this could translate into saving a significant number of lives.’ “


Few Circulating Cancer Cells Could Cue Risk of Metastases

“A simple noninvasive blood test matched with state-of-the-art molecular imaging of individual cells could help oncologists understand their patients’ chances of survival, say researchers. Metastasis accounts for an estimated 90 percent of cancer deaths. For decades, researchers tried to develop a way to gauge a cancer’s risk of metastasizing from a blood sample — the long-sought-after liquid biopsy.”


Few Circulating Cancer Cells Could Cue Risk of Metastases

“A simple noninvasive blood test matched with state-of-the-art molecular imaging of individual cells could help oncologists understand their patients’ chances of survival, say researchers. Metastasis accounts for an estimated 90 percent of cancer deaths. For decades, researchers tried to develop a way to gauge a cancer’s risk of metastasizing from a blood sample — the long-sought-after liquid biopsy.”


Few Circulating Cancer Cells Could Cue Risk of Metastases

“A simple noninvasive blood test matched with state-of-the-art molecular imaging of individual cells could help oncologists understand their patients’ chances of survival, say researchers. Metastasis accounts for an estimated 90 percent of cancer deaths. For decades, researchers tried to develop a way to gauge a cancer’s risk of metastasizing from a blood sample — the long-sought-after liquid biopsy.”


Melanoma of the Eye: Better Diagnostics and Future Treatments


Laitr Keiows / Wikimedia Commons Laitr Keiows / Wikimedia Commons

Ocular melanomas, or melanomas found in the eye, are fairly infrequent, but they are the most common type of eye tumor. In the U.S., there are about 2,000 cases diagnosed each year. They occur within one of the three parts of the eye: the iris, the choroid, or the ciliary body. Collectively, these are known as the ‘uvea,’ hence an alternative name for this cancer: uveal melanoma. Continue reading…