Shared Decision Making Missing in Cancer Screening Discussions

“A national survey of patients reveals that physicians don’t always fully discuss the risks and benefits of cancer screening, reports a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

“The study examined data from more than 1100 people aged 50 and older who made decisions about whether to undergo screening for breast cancer, colorectal cancer, or prostate cancer in the previous 2 years. Participants were asked whether their physicians discussed the pros and cons of screening and of forgoing screening, and if they had been given a choice whether or not to be screened.”


Shared Decision Making Missing in Cancer Screening Discussions

“A national survey of patients reveals that physicians don’t always fully discuss the risks and benefits of cancer screening, reports a new study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

“The study examined data from more than 1100 people aged 50 and older who made decisions about whether to undergo screening for breast cancer, colorectal cancer, or prostate cancer in the previous 2 years. Participants were asked whether their physicians discussed the pros and cons of screening and of forgoing screening, and if they had been given a choice whether or not to be screened.”


Myriad Genetics, Inc. – Myriad myPath(TM) Melanoma Test Improves the Reliability of Melanoma Diagnosis

“Myriad Genetics, Inc. (Nasdaq:MYGN) today presented results from a pivotal clinical validation study of the Myriad myPath™ Melanoma test at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. The Myriad myPath Melanoma test is a novel molecular test that accurately differentiates malignant melanoma from benign skin lesions with a high level of accuracy and helps physicians deliver a more objective and confident diagnosis for patients.”


One Step Closer to a Breath Test for Lung Cancer

“A test of organic compounds in exhaled breath can not only distinguish patients with lung cancer from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but can also define the stage of any cancer present, new research shows. The device requires blowing up a balloon, which is then attached to an extremely sensitive gold nanoparticle sensor. The particles in the sensor trap and then help to analyze volatile organic compounds in the exhaled breath.”


Lung Cancer Screening Abnormalities Prompted Smoking Cessation

“Smokers who received abnormal or suspicious lung cancer screening results were less likely to still smoke at the time of the next year’s screen, according to study results.

“Martin C. Tammemägi, PhD, of the department of health sciences at Brock University in Ontario, Canada, and colleagues reviewed National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) data on 14,692 adults who were current smokers at baseline and did not develop lung cancer during follow-up. The median age of patients was 60.6 years; a majority were men (58.7%) and non-Hispanic white (89.5%).”


Bronchial Gene Test Rules Out Lung Cancer

“Gene analysis of the bronchial airway could reduce unnecessary invasive testing for suspected cases of lung cancer, a study suggested.

“A 17-gene test for normal epithelial cells gathered on bronchoscopy boosted the ability of that procedure to rule out cancer, Duncan Whitney, PhD, of test developer Allegro Diagnostics in Maynard, Mass., and colleagues found.”


The Ups and Downs of Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose CT

“As a form of cancer that kills 90% of those who develop it, lung cancer is a particularly fearsome adversary to the field of oncology. However, because half of patients with lung cancer have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis, early detection offers hope for reduced mortality.

“To this end, several organizations — including the American Cancer Society (ACS), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, the American Lung Association (ALA) and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) — have updated their lung cancer screening guidelines to suggest screenings with low-dose CT.”


On the Path of Better Ways to Treat Prostate Cancer

“Improved screening means doctors are more likely to detect prostate cancer in time to treat it, but knowing when that treatment will be necessary is still uncertain.

“Prostate cancer develops in two distinct ways. In one form, it is a slow-growing cancer that affects one in nine men overall or one in five men aged 85 or older, and which can be treated if detected early. The other form looks just like its twin, but is aggressive, becomes resistant to treatment, spreads rapidly and eventually kills the patient.”


10 Issues to Consider During National Skin Cancer Awareness Month

“Accounting for approximately half of all cancers in the United States, skin cancer is widely recognized as the most common cause of cancer nationwide. More than 3.5 million cases of skin cancer are diagnosed each year, and according to the Skin Cancer Foundation, incidences of skin cancer outnumber all combined cases of breast, colon, lung and prostate cancers.

“With the month of May designated as National Skin Cancer Awareness Month, HemOnc Today highlights 10 issues for oncologists and dermatologists to consider for their patients, as well as the new guideline revisions and research regarding the identification, treatment and management of patients with melanoma and skin cancer.”