Next-Generation Genome Screening is Step toward Precision Cancer Medicine for Lung Cancer

“Precision cancer medicine has taken a strong step forward at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center. The technology, known as next generation “multiplex” gene sequencing, analyzes 50-plus genes in DNA extracted from a tumor biopsy for particular genetic mutations. Previous technology required pathologists to analyze one mutation per tissue sample. This second-generation genome sequencing assesses more than 2,500 mutations in a single reaction.”


UCSC Receives $3.5M NCI Grant to Build Database of Cancer Genomic Interpretations

“To help the biomedical community build on the information provided by projects like the Cancer Genome Atlas, the University of California, Santa Cruz is developing a database called the Biomedical Evidence Graph, or BMED, that will capture and connect cancer genome analyses and interpretation results. The five-year $3.5 million effort, which is funded by the National Cancer Institute, will also run community-wide contests similar to the Critical Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction and other experiments in order to build a pipeline composed of the most accurate algorithms for calling mutations, detecting fusion genes, and other kinds of analyses.”


UCSC Receives $3.5M NCI Grant to Build Database of Cancer Genomic Interpretations

“To help the biomedical community build on the information provided by projects like the Cancer Genome Atlas, the University of California, Santa Cruz is developing a database called the Biomedical Evidence Graph, or BMED, that will capture and connect cancer genome analyses and interpretation results. The five-year $3.5 million effort, which is funded by the National Cancer Institute, will also run community-wide contests similar to the Critical Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction and other experiments in order to build a pipeline composed of the most accurate algorithms for calling mutations, detecting fusion genes, and other kinds of analyses.”


UCSC Receives $3.5M NCI Grant to Build Database of Cancer Genomic Interpretations

“To help the biomedical community build on the information provided by projects like the Cancer Genome Atlas, the University of California, Santa Cruz is developing a database called the Biomedical Evidence Graph, or BMED, that will capture and connect cancer genome analyses and interpretation results. The five-year $3.5 million effort, which is funded by the National Cancer Institute, will also run community-wide contests similar to the Critical Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction and other experiments in order to build a pipeline composed of the most accurate algorithms for calling mutations, detecting fusion genes, and other kinds of analyses.”


TERT Promoter Mutations in Ocular Melanoma Distinguish Between Conjunctival and Uveal Tumours

“Background: Recently, activating mutations in the TERT promoter were identified in cutaneous melanoma. We tested a cohort of ocular melanoma samples for similar mutations. Methods: The TERT promoter region was analysed by Sanger sequencing in 47 uveal (ciliary body or choroidal) melanomas and 38 conjunctival melanomas.”


Mutational Heterogeneity in Cancer and the Search for New Cancer-Associated Genes

“Major international projects are underway that are aimed at creating a comprehensive catalogue of all the genes responsible for the initiation and progression of cancer123456789. These studies involve the sequencing of matched tumour–normal samples followed by mathematical analysis to identify those genes in which mutations occur more frequently than expected by random chance. Here we describe a fundamental problem with cancer genome studies: as the sample size increases, the list of putatively significant genes produced by current analytical methods burgeons into the hundreds.”


Mutational Heterogeneity in Cancer and the Search for New Cancer-Associated Genes

“Major international projects are underway that are aimed at creating a comprehensive catalogue of all the genes responsible for the initiation and progression of cancer123456789. These studies involve the sequencing of matched tumour–normal samples followed by mathematical analysis to identify those genes in which mutations occur more frequently than expected by random chance. Here we describe a fundamental problem with cancer genome studies: as the sample size increases, the list of putatively significant genes produced by current analytical methods burgeons into the hundreds.”


Mutational Heterogeneity in Cancer and the Search for New Cancer-Associated Genes

“Major international projects are underway that are aimed at creating a comprehensive catalogue of all the genes responsible for the initiation and progression of cancer123456789. These studies involve the sequencing of matched tumour–normal samples followed by mathematical analysis to identify those genes in which mutations occur more frequently than expected by random chance. Here we describe a fundamental problem with cancer genome studies: as the sample size increases, the list of putatively significant genes produced by current analytical methods burgeons into the hundreds.”


Mathematical Method Of Simplifying And Interpreting Genome Data De-Clutters Cancer-Cell Data, Revealing Tumor Evolution, Treatment Leads

“In our daily lives, clutter is something that gets in our way, something that makes it harder for us to accomplish things. For doctors and scientists trying to parse mountains of raw biological data, clutter is more than a nuisance; it can stand in the way of figuring out how best to treat someone who is very sick. Using increasingly cheap and rapid methods to read the billions of ‘letters’ that comprise human genomes – including the genomes of individual cells sampled from cancerous tumors – scientists are generating far more data than they can easily interpret.”