Adding Bone Drugs to Radium-223 May Enhance Benefit in mCRPC

Excerpt:

“Men with bone-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) appeared to derive additional benefits from treatment with radium-223 with concomitant bone-targeted therapies, according to data from an extended-access program.

“After a median follow-up of 7.5 months from initial injection of radium-223, patients on concomitant denosumab had yet to reach a median overall survival (OS), whereas patients treated with radium-223 alone had a median survival of 13.4 months.”

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The Potential of Radium-223 as a Treatment in mCRPC

“From its approval in May 2013 to recently being considered as a combination treatment with other drugs, radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo) shows great potential in positively impacting treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), according to Michael Morris, MD, medical oncologist, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

‘This drug has been shown to prolong survival and improve quality of life in men with mCRPC. It improves overall survival; therefore, it helps patients live longer. It also delays complications related to bone metastases, known as SSE. These include bone fracture, bone pain, spinal cord compression, and others. Nevertheless, the drug is not only helping patients live longer, but it is helping them live better, as well,’ said Morris in an interview with Targeted Oncology.”


Training for Patients with Melanoma and Their Partners on Skin Examinations

“Training on skin self-examination (SSE) to aid early detection could be extra beneficial for patients with melanoma and their partners who report having low relationship quality because it gives them activities to do together, according to an article published online by JAMA Dermatology.

“Melanoma remains a significant public health concern with an estimated 73,000 new cases of invasive melanoma and more than 9,900 deaths expected to occur in 2015. Melanoma is a treatable cancer with a high survival rate if it is detected early. Individuals previously diagnosed with melanoma are 10 times more likely to develop additional melanomas, which makes them an important population on which to focus early detection. Melanomas detected during SSE are more likely to have favorable outcomes. However, many areas on the body are difficult to examine by oneself so a skin-check partner is beneficial.”