Steroids Lower Survival Benefits Associated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“The use of steroids at baseline was associated with inferior survival outcomes in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who were starting either PD-1 or PD-L1 blockade therapy, according to retrospective data presented at ASCO Annual Meeting.

” ‘Treatment with PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors is now standard therapy for nearly all patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer,’ Kathryn C. Arbour, MD, a fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, said during her presentation. ‘The potential impact of steroids in patients with PD-1 or PD-L1 blockade has been an open question. Steroids are frequently used as a supportive medication in cancer care and can provide rapid relief of numerous cancer-related symptoms, including dyspnea, anorexia, pain, fatigue and symptoms associated with brain metastases. However … [physicians] routinely recognize that there can be substantial toxicities associated with long-term steroid use.’ ”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Steroid Use With Abiraterone Offers Multidimensional Benefits to Patients With mCRPC

Excerpt:

“For decades, the standard of care for men with advanced prostate cancer has been the depletion or inhibition of androgens. While androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) often results in temporary tumor regression or symptom relief in some patients, disease progression ultimately occurs over time. For patients with metastatic disease, the median overall survival (OS), until very recently, had been less than 2 years after chemotherapy.

“While tumor progression with ADT was previously believed to be hormone-refractory or androgen-independent, a large body of evidence supports that metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is commonly driven by elevated steroid synthesis, increased expression or splice variants of the androgen receptor (AR), or AR ligand promiscuity, indicating the ongoing need for targeted androgen therapies.”

Go to full article.

Do you have questions about this story? Let us know in a comment below. If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our Ask Cancer Commons service.


Steroid Treatment May Improve Cancer-Related Fatigue

Fatigue is a common and often debilitating symptom for people with advanced cancer. A recent clinical trial found that the steroid dexamethasone reduced fatigue in cancer patients who took it for 14 days. Other related symptoms, such as pain and loss of appetite, also improved, as did overall quality of life. However, in a recent survey, only one-quarter to one-third of cancer physicians said that they regularly use steroids to manage cancer-related fatigue. Because steroids can have serious side effects with long-term use, they may be most useful for patients with limited life expectancies or whose fatigue can be expected to resolve after short-term treatment.


Steroid Treatment May Improve Cancer-Related Fatigue

Fatigue is a common and often debilitating symptom for people with advanced cancer. A recent clinical trial found that the steroid dexamethasone reduced fatigue in cancer patients who took it for 14 days. Other related symptoms, such as pain and loss of appetite, also improved, as did overall quality of life. However, in a recent survey, only one-quarter to one-third of cancer physicians said that they regularly use steroids to manage cancer-related fatigue. Because steroids can have serious side effects with long-term use, they may be most useful for patients with limited life expectancies or whose fatigue can be expected to resolve after short-term treatment.


Steroid Treatment May Improve Cancer-Related Fatigue

Fatigue is a common and often debilitating symptom for people with advanced cancer. A recent clinical trial found that the steroid dexamethasone reduced fatigue in cancer patients who took it for 14 days. Other related symptoms, such as pain and loss of appetite, also improved, as did overall quality of life. However, in a recent survey, only one-quarter to one-third of cancer physicians said that they regularly use steroids to manage cancer-related fatigue. Because steroids can have serious side effects with long-term use, they may be most useful for patients with limited life expectancies or whose fatigue can be expected to resolve after short-term treatment.