Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Survival Rates Higher Among Patients Treated at Academic Centers

Excerpt:

“As non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) survival rates have increased over time, new research sheds light on how NSCLC outcomes are significantly influenced by the type of treatment facility where patients undergo care. Dr. Bhagirathbhai Dholaria of the Moffitt Cancer Center in the United States presented these findings at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) 18th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) in Yokohama, Japan.”

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Breast-Cancer Death Rate Drops Almost 40 Percent, Saving 322,000 Lives, Study Says

Excerpt:

“Breast cancer death rates declined almost 40 percent between 1989 and 2015, averting 322,600 deaths, the American Cancer Society reportedTuesday.

“Breast cancer death rates increased by 0.4 percent per year from 1975 to 1989, according to the study. After that, mortality rates decreased rapidly, for a 39 percent drop overall through 2015.  The report, the latest to document a long-term reduction in breast-cancer mortality, attributed the declines to both improvements in treatments and to early detection by mammography.”

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In Breast Cancer, a Victory for Common Sense

Excerpt:

“New 10-year results from a major clinical trial in breast cancer confirm that it does not compromise overall survival to leave behind minimal amounts of cancer that have spread to the underarm lymph nodes in certain patients, according to the investigators.

“The long-term data are from the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group Z0011 trial and were published online September 12 in JAMA.

“The study participants were women with clinical T1 or T2 invasive breast cancer, no palpable axillary nodes, and 1 or 2 sentinel lymph nodes containing metastases. In addition to lymph node management, all patients were treated with lumpectomy, tangential whole-breast irradiation, and adjuvant systemic therapy.”

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Using Alternative Medicine Only for Cancer Linked to Lower Survival Rate

Excerpt:

“Patients who choose to receive alternative therapy as treatment for curable cancers instead of conventional cancer treatment have a higher risk of death, according to researchers from the Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center at Yale School of Medicine and Yale Cancer Center. The findings were reported online by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

“There is increasing interest by  and families in pursuing alternative medicine as opposed to conventional  treatment. This trend has created a difficult situation for patients and providers. Although it is widely believed that conventional cancer treatment will provide the greatest chance at cure, there is limited research evaluating the effectiveness of alternative medicine for cancer.”

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Abiraterone/ADT Combo Increased Prostate Cancer Survival

Excerpt:

“Combined therapy with abiraterone acetate/prednisone plus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) significantly improved overall survival and radiographic progression-free survival (PFS) among men with metastatic hormone-naive prostate cancer compared with ADT and placebo alone, according to the results of the phase III LATITUDE trial (abstract LBA3) presented at the 2017 ASCO Annual Meeting.

” ‘In my opinion, these findings support the fact that adding abiraterone and prednisone to castration should now be considered the new standard of care for men with newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer,’ said researcher Karim Fizazi, MD, PhD, head of the department of cancer medicine at Gustave Roussy, University Paris-Sud, Villejuif, France.”

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Longer Survival Seen with Breast Cancer Mets

Excerpt:

“An increasing number of women in the U.S. survive with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) as both median and 5-year survival rates improved, especially among younger women, according to a back-calculation method study.

“As of Jan. 1, 2017, 154,794 women were estimated to be living with MBC in the country, 75% of whom had initial diagnoses of stage I to III breast cancer and later progressed to MBC, reported Angela Mariotto, PhD, of the NCI in Bethesda, Md., and colleagues.

“The data showed a twofold increase in 5-year survival for women, ages 15 to 49, with MBC at diagnosis (de novo MBC), from 18% in 1992-1994 to 36% in 2005-2012, they wrote in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.”

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Similar 10-Year Survival With Active Monitoring, Surgery, or Radiotherapy for PSA-Detected Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“In the UK ProtecT trial reported in The New England Journal of Medicine, Freddie C. Hamdy, FRCS, FMedSci, of the University of Oxford, and colleagues found no significant differences in prostate cancer–specific or overall mortality among men with clinically localized prostate cancer detected by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing who underwent active monitoring, surgery, or radiotherapy. Metastases and disease progression were more common with active monitoring. Median follow-up in the study was 10 years.”

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Timing of Surgery After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Stage IIIA NSCLC Impacts Overall Survival

Excerpt:

“The timing of surgery after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in patients with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) affects the overall survival of patients receiving trimodality therapy.

“Approximately one third of all NSCLC patients have locally advanced (stage III, subtypes IIIA and IIIB) disease at the time of diagnosis, with a five-year survival ranging from 7 to 19%. Patients with stage III NSCLC represent a significant clinical challenge due to the poor prognosis associated with this stage of the disease. Trimodality therapy involving the use of radiation concurrently with chemotherapy, otherwise known as neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NCRT), followed by surgery is an acceptable treatment strategy for stage IIIA patients with resectable tumors and limited mediastinal node (N2) involvement. However, trimodality therapy has not been shown to have significant survival advantage over definitive chemoradiation therapy and the optimal interval to surgery (ITS) after completion of NCRT has not been well explored.”

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Lung Cancer Patients Whose Tumour Has Spread to the Brain Could Be Spared Radiotherapy

Excerpt:

“Patients with non-small cell lung cancer which has spread to the brain could be spared whole brain radiotherapy as it makes little or no difference to how long they survive and their quality of life according to a Cancer Research UK-funded clinical trial published today in The Lancet(link is external).

“Around 45,500 people are diagnosed with lung cancer in the UK every year and an estimated 85 per cent of cases are non-small cell lung cancer. Up to 30 per cent of patients with non-small cell lung cancer have the disease spread to the brain.”

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