Osimertinib Improves Symptoms in Advanced Lung Cancer Patients

Excerpt:

“Osimertinib improves cancer-related symptoms in patients with advanced lung cancer, according to an analysis of patient-reported outcomes from the AURA3 phase III clinical trial presented at the European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC).

” ‘With my past experience conducting clinical trials, I often see new treatments that might be more effective, but are also usually more toxic,’ said lead author Dr Chee Lee, Medical Oncologist, St George Hospital Cancer Care Centre, New South Wales, Australia. ‘Osimertinib not only increases progression-free survival but it is well-tolerated, which makes a big difference for our patients.’ ”

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Naturally Occurring Symptoms May Be Mistaken for Tamoxifen Side-Effects

Excerpt:

“Women taking tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer were less likely to continue taking the drug if they suffered nausea and vomiting, according to new data presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium today (Friday).

“The researchers found that women who experienced these symptoms after starting tamoxifen as part of the Cancer Research UK funded International Breast Cancer Intervention Study (IBIS-1), were more likely to stop taking the medication.

“But this new analysis also reveals that women given a placebo who experienced the same symptoms were equally as likely to stop. This suggests that some symptoms due to other causes, were being mistaken for side effects of tamoxifen.”

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Patients Turn to Palliative Care for Relief from Serious Illness

“Patients with serious illnesses need medical treatments to survive. But they are increasingly taking advantage of the specialty known as palliative care, which offers day-to-day relief from symptoms as well as stress and lifestyle management.

“Though often regarded as only for older patients with terminal illness before they enter hospice programs at the end of life, palliative care is increasingly being offered to patients of any age with a range of chronic illnesses such as cancer, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s. It may be provided at the same time as curative medical regimens to help patients tolerate side effects of disease and treatment, and carry on with everyday life.

“ ‘Most people who need palliative care are in fact not dying, but have one or more chronic diseases which they may live with for many years,’ says Diane E. Meier, director of the nonprofit Center to Advance Palliative Care and a professor at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. For a 24-year-old with acute leukemia, there is a 70% chance of survival, Dr. Meier says, ‘but the treatment is physically devastating, and that suffering is remediable with palliative care.’ ”


Lymphedema Home Treatment Improves Outcomes, Reduces Costs, Researchers Find

“Home therapy helps control symptoms and save on the costs of treating lymphedema, a painful, often debilitating side effect of life-saving cancer treatments, a new study has found.

“Patients with swelling caused by cancer-associated lymphedema can both reduce the severity of the disease and the overall cost of medical care by taking therapeutic steps at home, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

“The study looked at the prevalence of lymphedema, a common side effect of cancer treatments, and found that the average annual cost of care for a patient with the condition decreased from $62,190 to $50,000 a year when the patient used pneumatic compression devices to treat the swelling.

” ‘Total health-care costs for these patients are very high, but can be profoundly reduced with treatment intervention, in this case a compression device,’ said Stanley Rockson, MD, professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford and senior author of the study, published online Dec. 3 in PLOS ONE. ‘This is clearly a compelling argument for increased coverage of similar home-care devices to reduce costs.’ “


Expertise, Preventive Care Important to Stop Ovarian Cancer

“You’ve heard the saying, “If it isn’t broke, don’t fix it.”

“However, in the case of certain cancers, such as ovarian cancer, you might not know it needs to be fixed because you don’t know something is wrong.

” ‘The symptoms for ovarian cancer more often come at the later stages, and we really don’t have an effective screening protocol for the general population besides genetic carriers of the BRCA mutation,’ says Thomas Herzog, MD, professor in the division of gynecologic oncology at the University of Cincinnati (UC), clinical director of the UC Cancer Institute and UC Health gynecologic oncologist. ‘This is why it is so important to know your risks and to seek the best care possible if you are affected by this type of cancer.’ “


Cancer Patients Diagnosed More Quickly

“The time taken to diagnose some of the more common cancers—from the point when a patient first reports a possible symptom to their general practitioner (GP)– fell in adults by an average of five days in just under a decade, according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer.”

Editor’s Note: In the study, time from first symptoms to cancer diagnosis fell from an average of 125 to 120 days in 7 years, for adults in the UK.


Cancer Patients Diagnosed More Quickly

“The time taken to diagnose some of the more common cancers—from the point when a patient first reports a possible symptom to their general practitioner (GP)– fell in adults by an average of five days in just under a decade, according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer.”

Editor’s Note: In the study, time from first symptoms to cancer diagnosis fell from an average of 125 to 120 days in 7 years, for adults in the UK.


Cancer Patients Diagnosed More Quickly

“The time taken to diagnose some of the more common cancers – from the point when a patient first reports a possible symptom to their general practitioner (GP) – fell in adults by an average of five days in just under a decade, according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer.”

Editor’s Note: In the study, time from first symptoms to cancer diagnosis fell from an average of 125 to 120 days in 7 years, for adults in the UK.