AstraZeneca Wins U.S. Approval for 1st-Line Use of Lung Cancer Drug

Excerpt:

“U.S. regulators have expanded use of AstraZeneca’s lung cancer drug Tagrisso to include initial treatment of patients with a specific genetic mutation, the company said on Wednesday.

“The latest Food and Drug Administration approval includes patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer whose tumors have epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations as detected by an FDA-approved test.

“Tagrisso, also known as osimertinib, was already approved for use in patients whose lung cancer worsened after treatment with other EGFR therapies and who have developed a secondary mutation.”

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Targetable Mutations in NSCLC: More Testing Needed!


Diagnosis of adenocarcinoma of the lung, a major subtype of non-small lung cancer (NSCLC), nowadays triggers mandatory testing of tumor tissue for alterations in four genes: EGFR, ALK, ROS1, and more recently, BRAF. If present, these alterations predict sensitivity to specific targeted drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that work better and often longer than standard chemotherapy, and are better tolerated.

However, there are many more targetable/actionable genomic alterations (also known as “drivers”) in NSCLC. This blog post will briefly discuss most of them, with the goal of promoting molecular testing for more than the four “usual suspects” mentioned above. Some patients with these alterations may benefit from FDA-approved drugs or from enrollment in clinical trials that are testing additional drugs and drug combinations. Continue reading…


FDA Grants Frontline Osimertinib Priority Review for NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The FDA has granted a priority review to a supplemental new drug application (sNDA) for the use of osimertinib (Tagrisso) as a first-line treatment for patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors harbor EGFR mutations (exon 19 deletions or exon 21 [L858R] substitution mutations).

“The sNDA is based on the phase III FLAURA study, in which frontline osimertinib reduced the risk of progression or death by 54% versus standard TKI therapy—erlotinib (Tarceva) or gefitinib (Iressa). In the double-blind study, the median progression-free survival (PFS) was 10.2 months (95% CI, 9.6-11.1) for standard therapy and 18.9 months (95% CI, 12.5-21.4) with osimertinib (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.37-0.57; P <.0001).”

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Ramalingam Shares Notable Updates in NCCN Guidelines for EGFR+ NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Among the notable updates in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network’s (NCCN) recently released  treatment guidelines for non–small cell cancer (NSCLC) is the category 2A recommendation to give osimertinib (Tagrisso), a third-generation irreversible EGFR inhibitor designed to inhibit both EGFR-sensitizing and EGFR T790M-resistance mutations, in the first-line setting for patients whose disease is EGFR mutant, explains Suresh A. Ramalingam, MD.

“Osimertinib was also given a category 1 recommendation as a subsequent therapy after patients progressed on treatment with standard EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib (Tarceva), gefitinib (Iressa), and afatinib (Gilotrif). The FDA granted a breakthrough therapy designation to a supplemental biologics license application for osimertinib as a frontline treatment for patients with metastatic EGFR-mutation–positive NSCLC in October 2017. The application was based on findings from the double-blind, phase III FLAURA trial, in which frontline osimertinib was associated with a 54% reduction in the risk of progression or death compared with standard therapy.”

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Update Sustains Osimertinib Activity Against CNS Mets in NSCLC

Excerpt:

“New results again demonstrated the benefit of frontline osimertinib (Tagrisso) in patients with EGFR-positive advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and CNS metastases at baseline, according to data presented at the 2017 ESMO Asia Congress.

“The subgroup analysis from the phase III FLAURA trial included 128 patients with at least 1 measurable and/or nonmeasurable CNS lesion at baseline. Among 61 patients who received osimertinib, the CNS objective response rate (ORR) was 66%, compared to 43% (odds ratio, 2.5; 95% CI 1.2-5.2; P = .011) in 67 patients who received standard EGFR TKI therapy with erlotinib (Tarceva) or gefitinib (Iressa).”

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Osimertinib Continues to Show Impressive Activity in EGFR+ NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Osimertinib (Tagrisso) has impressed researchers in the field of EGFR-mutant non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), most recently with results from the phase III FLAURA trial solidifying its benefit.

“In FLAURA, treatment with frontline osimertinib led to a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 18.9 months (95% CI, 15.2-21.4). This represented a 54% risk reduction in progression or death compared with a standard EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) for patients with locally advanced or metastatic EGFR-mutant NSCLC.”

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MET/EGFR Combo Effective for Advanced NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The combination of osimertinib (Tagrisso) and the MET inhibitor savolitinib showed signs of efficacy for pretreated patients with MET-positive, EGFR-mutant non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), regardless of prior treatment with a T790M-directed therapy, according to findings from part B of the TATTON trial presented at the 2017 World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC).

“Across patients in the phase Ib study (N = 64), the objective response rate (ORR) was 47% with the combination of osimertinib and savolitinib. In those pretreated with a T790M-directed therapy (n = 30), the ORR was 33% and in those with T790M-negative disease (n = 23) the ORR was 61%. In patients with T790M-positive disease (n = 11), the ORR was 55% for the combination.”

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EGFR-mutant NSCLC: Choice of First-Line Treatment May Get More Complicated


Medical guidelines for treatment of newly diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) mandate upfront testing of tumor tissue for mutations in the EGFR gene (as well as ALK and ROS gene translocation). EGFR mutations are found in 10 to 15% of white patients, but in patients of East Asian origin such mutations are in encountered in approximately 48%. However, with new data and drugs entering the playing field, newly diagnosed patients’ treatment decisions could become more complex.

There is a good reason to test for EGFR mutations: the accumulated data show that, compared to first-line chemotherapy, treatment with drugs that inhibit the activity of EGFR in patients with activating EGFR mutations improves patients’ median progression-free survival (PFS) time from 4.6 to 6.9 months to 9.6 to 13.1 months, and has a higher objective response rate (ORR). Moreover, EGFR inhibitors are associated with a significantly lower incidence of adverse effects and better control of disease symptoms. Continue reading…


Tagrisso Significantly Improves Progression-Free Survival in the Phase III FLAURA Trial for Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“AstraZeneca today announced that the Phase III FLAURA trial showed a statistically-significant and clinically-meaningful progression-free survival (PFS) benefit with Tagrisso (osimertinib) compared to current 1st-line standard-of-care treatment (erlotinib or gefitinib) in previously-untreated patients with locally-advanced or metastatic epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive (EGFRm) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

“Sean Bohen, Executive Vice President, Global Medicines Development and Chief Medical Officer at AstraZeneca, said: ‘The strong results from the FLAURA trial are very exciting news for patients with EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer, providing physicians with a potential new first-line treatment option to improve outcomes in this disease. We will now initiate discussions with global health authorities on the data and regulatory submissions.’ ”

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