Melanoma Apps No Substitute for Doctors

A JAMA Dermatology study shows the dangers of using smartphone apps to self-diagnose melanomas. The researchers compared diagnoses of 60 melanomas and 128 benign lesions by a board-certified dermatopathologist to those of four apps. Three of the apps incorrectly said that 30% or more of the melanomas were harmless. The fourth app, which sent images to board-certified dermatologists, was better, but still misdiagnosed one of the melanomas as benign. These apps are not subject to regulatory oversight.

Primary source: http://archderm.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1557488#qundefined


Mutation Linked to Less Risk of Spreading in Eye Melanomas

A genetic abnormality may help predict which melanomas in the eye are unlikely to spread, according to a study in Nature Genetics. The researchers found that nearly 20% of 102 people with eye melanomas had a mutation in a gene called SF3B1. These people were usually younger when diagnosed and their tumors were less likely to spread and become deadly.

Primary source: http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ng.2523.html


New Phase III Study to Test Combining Dabrafenib and Trametinib

Pharmaceutical firm GlaxoSmithKline has started a phase III study to see if a drug combination can prevent or delay the recurrence of melanomas with BRAF V600 mutations. Both drugs—dabrafenib, a BRAF inhibitor and trametinib, a MEK inhibitor—are experimental; the study will assess the efficacy and safety of the combination. The researchers plan to enroll about 850 people from more than 200 sites worldwide in the study. Another pharmaceutical firm, Roche, is also doing late-stage trials of a different BRAF inhibitor/MEK inhibitor combination.


Genentech Adds MEK Inhibitor to Phase III BRAF Inhibitor Trial

Biotech company Genentech has added a MEK inhibitor to a phase III trial of vemurafenib, an FDA-approved BRAF inhibitor. MEK inhibitors have been shown to counteract resistance to BRAF inhibitors. The experimental MEK inhibitor is called GDC-0973, and is also known as XL-518 or RG7421. Vemurafenib (Zelboraf®) targets melanomas with BRAF V600 mutations, which are found in about half of these aggressive skin cancers. Genentech is part of the Roche Group; the two companies are conducting this combination treatment trial jointly.


First Evidence That the Immune System Can Halt Cancer Progession Permanently

New research in Nature shows that the immune system can control tumors permanently without destroying cells. The researchers treated cancers with two proteins that activate the immune system (interferon-g and tumor necrosis factor) and found that the combination kept tumors from growing by making the cells dormant. This work could ultimately lead to cancer treatments that are both effective and free of side effects, suggesting that we shift from the “war on cancer” strategy of killing tumor cells to focus instead on restoring the body’s innate ability to arrest tumor development.