Doctors Should Discuss Treatment Expenses with Patients

A recent editorial argues that doctors should talk about the issue of cost when discussing treatment options with patients. High out-of-pocket treatment expenses can cause severe financial hardship that may affect patients’ well-being. A study showed that over 60% of patients want to discuss treatment cost with their doctors, yet only 15% do so. Even though patients frequently want to choose the best treatment regardless of expense, sometimes there are viable lower-cost alternatives. Moreover, some patients may indeed be willing to trade potential medical benefits for less financial distress. Finally, even if patients do not change their treatment choices, discussing treatment costs can help them prepare financially for expensive procedures and learn about options for dealing with medical debt.


U.S. Government Report Outlines Serious Future Challenges in Cancer Care

A report by a U.S. government panel of experts warns of upcoming profound challenges in cancer care. The aging population means the number of cancer cases is growing and there may not be enough oncologists (cancer specialists) to care for all of them. While research has yielded new insights and produced innovative cancer treatments, better strategies are needed to ensure doctors can keep up with the many complex new medications. Medical professionals also need to develop easy-to-understand ways to communicate information to cancer patients, who are still often misinformed about their illness and treatment options. The report includes a list of questions patients should ask to ensure that they make informed choices about their care.


U.S. Government Report Outlines Serious Future Challenges in Cancer Care

A report by a U.S. government panel of experts warns of upcoming profound challenges in cancer care. The aging population means the number of cancer cases is growing and there may not be enough oncologists (cancer specialists) to care for all of them. While research has yielded new insights and produced innovative cancer treatments, better strategies are needed to ensure doctors can keep up with the many complex new medications. Medical professionals also need to develop easy-to-understand ways to communicate information to cancer patients, who are still often misinformed about their illness and treatment options. The report includes a list of questions patients should ask to ensure that they make informed choices about their care.


U.S. Government Report Outlines Serious Future Challenges in Cancer Care

A report by a U.S. government panel of experts warns of upcoming profound challenges in cancer care. The aging population means the number of cancer cases is growing and there may not be enough oncologists (cancer specialists) to care for all of them. While research has yielded new insights and produced innovative cancer treatments, better strategies are needed to ensure doctors can keep up with the many complex new medications. Medical professionals also need to develop easy-to-understand ways to communicate information to cancer patients, who are still often misinformed about their illness and treatment options. The report includes a list of questions patients should ask to ensure that they make informed choices about their care.


Gene Variations May Help Predict Response to Lung Cancer Treatment

Researchers have discovered genetic variations that may predict risk of death and help direct treatment for lung cancer patients. The researchers analyzed the DNA of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), looking for variations associated with survival. Four of the variants they identified were located on the same gene, called TNFRSF10B. Patients with these genetic variants had up to a 41% higher chance of death, especially if they were treated with surgery only. In contrast, if these patients received chemotherapy after surgery, their risk of death was not increased. The genetic variants may therefore be useful biomarkers for guiding treatment decisions.


Cancer Patients Want to Be More Involved in Treatment Decisions

Some cancer patients feel that they do not have enough say in their treatment decisions, a recent survey from the UK reveals. While 70% of respondents felt satisfied with their level of involvement, patients with certain rarer cancer types expressed a wish for more participation in treatment decisions, including those with rectal, ovarian, multiple myeloma, and bladder cancers. The desire for greater involvement was also more common in younger patients and ethnic minorities. While the survey was performed in the UK, similar issues are likely to affect patients in other countries, including the U.S. Several U.S. states have recently introduced legislation to support shared medical decision-making.


Cancer Patients Want to Be More Involved in Treatment Decisions

Some cancer patients feel that they do not have enough say in their treatment decisions, a recent survey from the UK reveals. While 70% of respondents felt satisfied with their level of involvement, patients with certain rarer cancer types expressed a wish for more participation in treatment decisions, including those with rectal, ovarian, multiple myeloma, and bladder cancers. The desire for greater involvement was also more common in younger patients and ethnic minorities. While the survey was performed in the UK, similar issues are likely to affect patients in other countries, including the U.S. Several U.S. states have recently introduced legislation to support shared medical decision-making.


Cancer Patients Want to Be More Involved in Treatment Decisions

Some cancer patients feel that they do not have enough say in their treatment decisions, a recent survey from the UK reveals. While 70% of respondents felt satisfied with their level of involvement, patients with certain rarer cancer types expressed a wish for more participation in treatment decisions, including those with rectal, ovarian, multiple myeloma, and bladder cancers. The desire for greater involvement was also more common in younger patients and ethnic minorities. While the survey was performed in the UK, similar issues are likely to affect patients in other countries, including the U.S. Several U.S. states have recently introduced legislation to support shared medical decision-making.