Novel Assay Developed for Detecting ALK Rearragement in NSCLC

“Researchers have developed a novel technique for detecting ALK rearrangements in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) that is more sensitive and easier to perform than currently available techniques. The technique can help enhance the routine practice of diagnostic ALK testing on NSCLCs, which is crucial for identifying patients with advanced NSCLC who are most likely to benefit from targeted therapy with an ALK inhibitor.”

Editor’s Note: “Molecular tests” like the one mentioned here can be very important for patients to choose the best treatment plan. Learn more at our Lung Cancer Basics.


Researchers Discover Protein to Better Forecast Prognosis of Prostate Cancer Patients

“Researchers at the Texas A&M Health Science Center (TAMHSC) Institute of Biosciences and Technology in Houston have identified a biomarker that will aid in more accurately determining the prognosis for prostate cancer patients, a finding that could have further implications for anti-cancer drug discovery and ultimately, cancer prevention.”


Prostate Cancer Advance Could Improve Treatment Options

“Researchers have made an important advance in understanding genetic changes associated with terminal prostate cancer. The research highlights why relapses could happen in some men following hormone therapy. And it could help identify those patients that will develop fatal prostate cancer much earlier for life-extending therapy.”


Most Cancer Physicians Would Choose Hospice for Themselves

In a survey of almost 4,500 physicians who treat cancer patients, the majority said that they would enroll in hospice if they themselves had terminal cancer. This was especially true for women, primary care physicians, those with more patients in managed care, and those treating more terminally ill patients. Physicians who expressed a higher preference for hospice for themselves were also more likely to discuss hospice care with their patients early on in treatment, suggesting that personal preferences regarding hospice can influence patient care. The survey’s authors therefore suggest that physicians with negative views of hospice for themselves should consider further educating themselves about how hospice may benefit their patients.


Most Cancer Physicians Would Choose Hospice for Themselves

In a survey of almost 4,500 physicians who treat cancer patients, the majority said that they would enroll in hospice if they themselves had terminal cancer. This was especially true for women, primary care physicians, those with more patients in managed care, and those treating more terminally ill patients. Physicians who expressed a higher preference for hospice for themselves were also more likely to discuss hospice care with their patients early on in treatment, suggesting that personal preferences regarding hospice can influence patient care. The survey’s authors therefore suggest that physicians with negative views of hospice for themselves should consider further educating themselves about how hospice may benefit their patients.


Most Cancer Physicians Would Choose Hospice for Themselves

In a survey of almost 4,500 physicians who treat cancer patients, the majority said that they would enroll in hospice if they themselves had terminal cancer. This was especially true for women, primary care physicians, those with more patients in managed care, and those treating more terminally ill patients. Physicians who expressed a higher preference for hospice for themselves were also more likely to discuss hospice care with their patients early on in treatment, suggesting that personal preferences regarding hospice can influence patient care. The survey’s authors therefore suggest that physicians with negative views of hospice for themselves should consider further educating themselves about how hospice may benefit their patients.


More Americans Support Prolonging Patients’ Lives by Any Means Possible

More Americans today support prolonging patients’ lives as much as possible no matter what, a survey showed. Thirty-one percent of those polled agreed with the statement “in all circumstances, doctors and nurses should do everything possible to save the life of a patient,” up from 15% in 1990 and 22% in 2005. Significantly fewer people are undecided on the issue (3%, down from 12% in 1990). The number of people agreeing with the alternate statement, “sometimes there are circumstances where a patient should be allowed to die,” dropped only slightly (from 73% in 1990 to 66% in 2013). For themselves, 35% would want providers to do “everything possible,” even if they had an incurable disease and were in severe pain. However, 78% would let a close relative decide whether to continue treatment for patients unable to communicate their wishes.


More Americans Support Prolonging Patients’ Lives by Any Means Possible

More Americans today support prolonging patients’ lives as much as possible no matter what, a survey showed. Thirty-one percent of those polled agreed with the statement “in all circumstances, doctors and nurses should do everything possible to save the life of a patient,” up from 15% in 1990 and 22% in 2005. Significantly fewer people are undecided on the issue (3%, down from 12% in 1990). The number of people agreeing with the alternate statement, “sometimes there are circumstances where a patient should be allowed to die,” dropped only slightly (from 73% in 1990 to 66% in 2013). For themselves, 35% would want providers to do “everything possible,” even if they had an incurable disease and were in severe pain. However, 78% would let a close relative decide whether to continue treatment for patients unable to communicate their wishes.


More Americans Support Prolonging Patients’ Lives by Any Means Possible

More Americans today support prolonging patients’ lives as much as possible no matter what, a survey showed. Thirty-one percent of those polled agreed with the statement “in all circumstances, doctors and nurses should do everything possible to save the life of a patient,” up from 15% in 1990 and 22% in 2005. Significantly fewer people are undecided on the issue (3%, down from 12% in 1990). The number of people agreeing with the alternate statement, “sometimes there are circumstances where a patient should be allowed to die,” dropped only slightly (from 73% in 1990 to 66% in 2013). For themselves, 35% would want providers to do “everything possible,” even if they had an incurable disease and were in severe pain. However, 78% would let a close relative decide whether to continue treatment for patients unable to communicate their wishes.