Expert Discusses Promise of Immunotherapy in TNBC

Excerpt:

“The combination of immunotherapy and chemotherapy is showing promising response rates in certain patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), said ESO Umberto Veronesi Memorial Award Winner Giuseppe Curigliano, MD, PhD, who addressed genetic determinants of breast cancer immunogenicity in his award lecture at the 15th St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference.

“Curigliano emphasized the importance of patient selection in optimizing immunotherapy in breast cancer. In a study done by Curigliano, in collaboration with the Sidra Medical Center in Qatar, a subgroup of patients with TNBC who would derive benefit from checkpoint inhibitors were identified. This group, he stated, should be selected based on individual assessment of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes.”

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Total Body Irradiation Did Not Improve Response of Adoptive Cell Transfer

Excerpt:

“Adding total body irradiation to preparative lymphodepletion chemotherapy prior to the adoptive cell transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) had no effect on tumor regression in patients with metastatic melanoma, according to the results of a study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“However, adoptive cell transfer of TILs did mediate the objective complete response of 24% of patients.

“ ‘The nonmyeloablative chemotherapy regimen thus seemed to provide sufficient lymphodepletion for successful adoptive transfer without the need to add total body irradiation,’ wrote researchers led by Stephanie L. Goff, MD, of the National Cancer Institute.”

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Expert Discusses Promise of CRS-207 Vaccine in Mesothelioma

Excerpt:

“The investigational cancer vaccine CRS-207 may improve response and survival when given with chemotherapy in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) according to results of a phase Ib trial.

“CRS-207, a live-attenuated, double-deleted Listeria monocytogene engineered to express the tumor-associated antigen mesothelin, was administered with chemotherapy to 38 patients with MPM. Of 34 evaluable patients, 59% (n = 20) had partial response posttreatment and 35% (n = 12) had stable disease, for an overall disease-control rate 94%. Median progression-free survival was 8.5 months and median overall survival had not been reached.

“Immunohistochemistry data from 3 patients revealed an increase in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) post–CRS-207. Treatment-associated changes in circulating immune cells and biomarkers were also observed.”

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TILs Advancing as Melanoma Immunotherapy Option

Excerpt:

“After nearly 30 years of research, tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) technology is being investigated as a means of producing personalized immunotherapy for patients with metastatic melanoma in a small clinical trial that may help open the door for broader application in other solid tumor types.

“The form of adoptive cell therapy, which utilizes TILs from the patient’s tumor, represents an intriguing way of overcoming the immunosuppressive power of cancer, according to Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD. The melanoma expert provided an overview of the technology and its potential benefit in a lecture for oncologists and oncology professionals presented by Targeted Oncology, a division of MJH Associates, the publisher of OncologyLive, on February 19 in Miami Beach, Florida. Weber is the deputy director of the Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, co-director of its melanoma program, and head of Experimental Therapeutics at NYU Langone Medical Center.”

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After Decades of Research, Potential for TILs in Melanoma Is Higher Than Ever

“Tumor infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) technology represents an intriguing way of overcoming the immunosuppressive power of cancer, according to Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD.

“Weber provided an overview of the technology and discussed its potential benefit to oncologists and oncology professionals in a lecture presented by Targeted Oncology on February 19, 2016.

“ ‘It’s yet another way of inducing remissions of long duration using an immunotherapeutic approach that’s different than ipilimumab and different than nivolumab or pembrolizumab,’ said Weber, the deputy director of the Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, co-director of the Melanoma Program, and head of Experimental Therapeutics at NYU Langone Medical Center. ‘It’s got its own toxicity, but you can fail this therapy and respond to ipilimumab or respond to nivolumab or pembrolizumab. You can fail nivolumab or pembrolizumab or ipilimumab and respond to this—they’re not cross-reactive.’ “


HER2-Positive Breast CA Patients Prosper on Solo Chemo

“Prognosis for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive patients with lymphocyte-predominant breast cancer (LPBC) was significantly better following treatment with chemotherapy alone than it was for their counterparts receiving chemotherapy plus trastuzumab (Herceptin), an exploratory analysis of the North Central Cancer Treatment Group-N9831 trial has shown.

“Among 489 patients from the N9831 trial receiving chemotherapy alone, 10-year Kaplan-Meier estimates for recurrence-free survival (RFS) among participants with high-levels of stromal tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (STILs) was 90.9% compared with 64.5% for patients with low-levels of STILs.

“In dramatic contrast, 10-year estimates for RFS among 456 patients who received the same chemotherapy regimen followed by weekly paclitaxel plus trastuzumab followed by trastuzumab alone were virtually identical in patients with high- and low-levels of STILs at 80% and 80.1%, respectively (HR 1.26; 95% CI 0.50-3.17; P=0.63).”


Higher Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocyte Level Associated With Better Outcomes in HER2-Positive Early Breast Cancer Independent of Neoadjuvant Treatment

“In an analysis of the NeoALTTO trial reported in JAMA Oncology, Salgado et al found that a higher level of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes was associated with improved pathologic compete response rate and event-free survival independent of neoadjuvant treatment received in patients with HER2-positive early breast cancer.

“In NeoALTTO, 455 patients were randomly assigned to receive neoadjuvant trastuzumab (Herceptin), lapatinib (Tykerb), or the combination for 6 weeks followed by the addition of weekly paclitaxel for 12 weeks and three cycles of fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide after surgery. Percentage of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes were measured by hematoxylin-eosin stained core biopsy sections taken at diagnosis.”


High TIL Levels Predict Positive Outcomes in HER-2–Positive Breast Cancer

“High levels of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes served as an independent positive predictive marker for EFS and pathological complete response in HER-2–positive early breast cancer treated with chemotherapy and anti-HER–2 agents, according a secondary analysis of the NeoALTTO trial.

“ ‘Increasingly, oncogenic addiction, in which tumors become dependent on a sole oncogenic pathway for growth, is thought to promote a tumor microenvironment conducive to immune escape,’ Sherene Loi, MD, PhD, of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre at the University of Melbourne, and colleagues wrote. ‘Although this had not been shown yet for HER-2 oncogenic signaling, one could speculate that anti-HER–2 therapy may not only work in a cell-intrinsic manner but may also reserve HER-2–induced immunosuppression as a mechanism for action.’

“The NeoALTTO trial included 455 women with HER-2–positive early-stage breast cancer between 2008 and 2010. The researchers randomly assigned patients to neoadjuvant treatment with trastuzumab (Herceptin, Genentech), lapatinib (Tykerb, GlaxoSmithKline) or both.

“Patients received the initial treatment for 6 weeks, followed by weekly paclitaxel for 12 weeks and three treatment cycles of fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide after surgery.”


Lion Biotechnologies Announces Positive Data From a TIL-Ipilimumab Combination Study in Melanoma

“Lion Biotechnologies, Inc. (Nasdaq: LBIO), a biotechnology company that is developing novel cancer immunotherapies based on tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), today announced that researchers from Moffitt Cancer Center reported positive results from a pilot trial of TIL and ipilimumab in patients with metastatic melanoma. The data from the trial, which Lion partially sponsored, were presented at the Society of Surgical Oncology 2015 meeting in Houston, TX on Friday, March 27, 2015.

“The Phase 1 trial was conducted at Moffitt Cancer Center in 12 patients with metastatic melanoma, with the objective of determining the safety and feasibility of combining TIL therapy with the CTLA-4 checkpoint inhibitor, ipilimumab. Patients were treated with ipilimumab one week prior to tumor harvest for TIL expansion, a second time while their TIL were being expanded, and two more times following TIL transfer.

“Of the 12 patients enrolled in the trial, 11 went on to receive their autologous TIL, with five out of the 11 TIL-treated patients (46%) responding to treatment (one complete response and four partial responses), consistent with response rates from previous TIL studies in metastatic melanoma. Notably, the researchers observed that following a single infusion of ipilimumab, TIL grew to higher numbers than historically had been observed in previous studies, in which ipilimumab was not administered prior to tumor harvest. In addition, only one of the 12 enrolled patients (8%) was ineligible for TIL transfer, indicating relatively high patient adherence to trial protocol.

” ‘Ipilimumab has potential to enhance the effectiveness of TIL therapy by boosting the concentration of tumor-reactive T cells in the tumors of patients prior to TIL harvest, and by controlling disease before TIL transfer,’ said Sangeetha Prabhakaran, MD, the study’s presenting author. ‘Based on the results of this study, we conclude that TIL-ipilimumab combination treatment is both safe and feasible. Furthermore, this approach serves as a model for future efforts to combine TIL with PD-1/PD-L1 blockade and other emerging immune checkpoint inhibitors.’ “