Nivolumab Plus Low-Dose Ipilimumab Shows Durable Responses for PD-L1-Negative, TMB-High NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The combination of nivolumab (Opdivo) and low-dose ipilimumab (Yervoy) reduced the risk of progression or death by 52% compared with standard platinum doublet chemotherapy for patients with metastatic PD-L1–negative, tumor mutation burden (TMB)-high non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to findings from the phase III CheckMate 227 trial presented at the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting.

“In the PD-L1–negative (<1% expression), TMB-high (≥10 mutations/megabase) subgroup, regardless of histology, median progression-free survival (PFS) with nivolumab/ipilimumab was 7.7 months compared with 5.3 months for chemotherapy and 6.2 months for nivolumab and chemotherapy. The 1-year PFS rate was 45% with nivolumab/ipilimumab compared with 27% for nivolumab/chemotherapy and just 8% for chemotherapy.”

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Opdivo Plus Low-Dose Yervoy Combination Reduces the Risk of Progression or Death by 42% Versus Chemotherapy in First-Line Lung Cancer Patients with High Tumor Mutational Burden (TMB)

Excerpt:

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE: BMY) today announced initial results from the pivotal Phase 3 study, CheckMate -227, evaluating the Opdivo (nivolumab) 3 mg/kg plus low-dose Yervoy (ipilimumab, 1 mg/kg) combination in first-line advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with high tumor mutational burden (TMB) ≥10 mutations/megabase (mut/Mb). In the study, the combination demonstrated a superior benefit for the co-primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS) versus chemotherapy (HR 0.58; 97.5% CI: 0.41 to 0.81; p=0.0002). The PFS benefit was observed regardless of PD-L1 expression levels and in both squamous and non-squamous tumor histology. Additionally, based on an early descriptive analysis, encouraging overall survival was observed with the combination versus chemotherapy in patients with high TMB ≥10 mut/Mb (HR 0.79; 95% CI: 0.56 to 1.10).”

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Predicting If an Immune Checkpoint Drug Will Work


Drugs that activate the immune system to attack cancer in a process known as immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) are a focus of intense investigation. A number of them are already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for various cancers; namely, the anti-CTLA4 antibody ipilimumab (Yervoy), two anti-PD-1 antibodies: pembrolizumab (Keytruda) and nivolumab (Opdivo), and three anti-PD-L1 drugs: atezolizumab (Tecentriq), avelumab (Bavencio) and durvalumab (Imfinzi). These ICB drugs have the potential to induce durable cancer regressions, but the majority of cancer patients just do not respond to them at all.

Biomarkers, signature molecules in the blood or other tissue, can sometimes be used to predict a patient’s response to a given treatment. But no reliable biomarkers exist for ICB, and this is a serious concern. Patients who may really benefit from ICB could be overlooked, and patients who are not likely to respond may receive useless (and very expensive) ICB treatment.

Most potential response predictors that have already been identified are not yet useful for one or all of the following reasons: they are not extensively validated, their significance is still uncertain and may differ from one cancer (or even one patient) to another, or they are technically challenging for routine use. These markers are addressed below. Continue reading…


Frontline Nivolumab/Ipilimumab Improves PFS in High TMB NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The combination of nivolumab (Opdivo) and ipilimumab (Yervoy) improved progression-free survival (PFS) compared with chemotherapy in treatment-naïve patients with high tumor mutation burden (TMB) non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

“Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS), the manufacturer of both immunotherapies, announced the preliminary findings from part 1a of the phase III CheckMate-227 trial in a press release. The company did not report any further data.”

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Cancer Mutation Gains Ground as Test for Immunotherapy Drugs

Excerpt:

“Scientists are stepping up the hunt for better diagnostic tests to predict if cancer patients will benefit from costly modern immunotherapy drugs, which are transforming cancer care but remain a hit-and-miss affair.

“Research presented at Europe’s biggest oncology congress in Madrid adds to evidence that patients with an above average number of genetic mutations in their tumors have a better chance of responding to the new treatments, and drugmakers are racing to confirm the idea.”

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