Myc-Driven Tumors Could be Next for Targeted Therapies

Scientists have made a breakthrough in inhibiting the tumor-driving protein myc, which previously had been impossible to target with drugs. Myc drives cells toward uncontrolled growth in tumors, and is involved in many of the most serious forms of cancer, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, brain cancer, prostate cancer, and blood cancer. Scientists have found that one drug that indirectly targets myc slows tumor growth in a mouse model of myc-driven cancer. The key to the breakthrough was recognizing that myc relies partially on MTOR, another protein, for its protein supply. By targeting MTOR, the drug keeps myc from promoting tumor growth. The drug, called MLN0128, is already in clinical trials for a variety of cancers, but this is the first time it has been viewed as a tool to treat myc-driven cancer. The researchers said that other indirect targeted therapy drugs are already being tested in human studies to treat myc-driven tumors.


'iKnife' Could Revolutionize Cancer Surgery

A new surgical tool–dubbed the ‘iKnife’–has the potential to change the way surgeons operate on cancer patients. Typically, surgeons use knives that vaporize tumors during procedures, which produces a strong-smelling smoke. Under standard protocol the surgeon must send tissue to the lab to be analyzed to determine whether or not it is cancerous, waiting on the results while the patient lies on the operating table for close to 30 minutes. The ‘iKnife’ eliminates the lab work, analyzing the smoke on its own to distinguish cancerous tissue from healthy tissue; it can tell doctors if the tissue is cancerous almost instantaneously. In a recent study, the knife correctly detected cancer in all 91 patients. Researchers believe the knife will lower tumor recurrence rates and enable more accurate procedures.


'iKnife' Could Revolutionize Cancer Surgery

A new surgical tool–dubbed the ‘iKnife’–has the potential to change the way surgeons operate on cancer patients. Typically, surgeons use knives that vaporize tumors during procedures, which produces a strong-smelling smoke. Under standard protocol the surgeon must send tissue to the lab to be analyzed to determine whether or not it is cancerous, waiting on the results while the patient lies on the operating table for close to 30 minutes. The ‘iKnife’ eliminates the lab work, analyzing the smoke on its own to distinguish cancerous tissue from healthy tissue; it can tell doctors if the tissue is cancerous almost instantaneously. In a recent study, the knife correctly detected cancer in all 91 patients. Researchers believe the knife will lower tumor recurrence rates and enable more accurate procedures.


Myc-Driven Tumors Could be Next for Targeted Therapies

Scientists have made a breakthrough in inhibiting the tumor-driving protein myc, which previously had been impossible to target with drugs. Myc drives cells toward uncontrolled growth in tumors, and is involved in many of the most serious forms of cancer, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, brain cancer, prostate cancer, and blood cancer. Scientists have found that one drug that indirectly targets myc slows tumor growth in a mouse model of myc-driven cancer. The key to the breakthrough was recognizing that myc relies partially on MTOR, another protein, for its protein supply. By targeting MTOR, the drug keeps myc from promoting tumor growth. The drug, called MLN0128, is already in clinical trials for a variety of cancers, but this is the first time it has been viewed as a tool to treat myc-driven cancer. The researchers said that other indirect targeted therapy drugs are already being tested in human studies to treat myc-driven tumors.


'iKnife' Could Revolutionize Cancer Surgery

A new surgical tool–dubbed the ‘iKnife’–has the potential to change the way surgeons operate on cancer patients. Typically, surgeons use knives that vaporize tumors during procedures, which produces a strong-smelling smoke. Under standard protocol the surgeon must send tissue to the lab to be analyzed to determine whether or not it is cancerous, waiting on the results while the patient lies on the operating table for close to 30 minutes. The ‘iKnife’ eliminates the lab work, analyzing the smoke on its own to distinguish cancerous tissue from healthy tissue; it can tell doctors if the tissue is cancerous almost instantaneously. In a recent study, the knife correctly detected cancer in all 91 patients. Researchers believe the knife will lower tumor recurrence rates and enable more accurate procedures.


Myc-Driven Tumors Could be Next for Targeted Therapies

Scientists have made a breakthrough in inhibiting the tumor-driving protein myc, which previously had been impossible to target with drugs. Myc drives cells toward uncontrolled growth in tumors, and is involved in many of the most serious forms of cancer, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, brain cancer, prostate cancer, and blood cancer. Scientists have found that one drug that indirectly targets myc slows tumor growth in a mouse model of myc-driven cancer. The key to the breakthrough was recognizing that myc relies partially on MTOR, another protein, for its protein supply. By targeting MTOR, the drug keeps myc from promoting tumor growth. The drug, called MLN0128, is already in clinical trials for a variety of cancers, but this is the first time it has been viewed as a tool to treat myc-driven cancer. The researchers said that other indirect targeted therapy drugs are already being tested in human studies to treat myc-driven tumors.


RNA Diagnostic Test Improves Diagnosis of Lung Cancer

The first step towards choosing the best lung cancer treatment is to figure out what specific kind of lung cancer a patient has. Usually, doctors can determine cancer type by surgically removing part of a tumor and examining the appearance of tumor cells under a microscope. But sometimes tumor samples are damaged and difficult to analyze visually, so a second method would be useful to help confirm a diagnosis. Researchers have now developed a new test that can determine which genes are turned on or off in tumor cells, allowing them to distinguish between the most common types of lung cancer (adenocarcinoma, carcinoid, small cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma). Samples of tumors are already routinely collected, and, in an experiment, examining them and analyzing their genetics was found to be a viable predictor of a tumor’s microscopic appearance. Researchers hope that their test will bring more accurate diagnoses to doctors and patients, which in turn could lead to better treatment recommendations and better outcomes.