FDA Grants Orphan Drug Designation to Tucatinib for Brain Metastases

Excerpt:

“The FDA granted orphan drug designation to tucatinib for the treatment of patients with breast cancer whose disease metastasized to the brain, according to the drug’s manufacturer.

“Tucatinib (ONT-380, Cascadian Therapeutics) is an investigational, orally bioavailable, potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is highly selective for HER-2 without significant inhibition of EGFR, which has been associated with significant toxicities.”

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FDA Broadens Ceritinib Indication to Previously Untreated ALK-Positive Metastatic NSCLC

Excerpt:

“On May 26, 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted regular approval to ceritinib (ZYKADIA, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp.) for patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors are anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive as detected by an FDA-approved test.

“In April 2014, ceritinib received accelerated approval for patients with ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC whose disease has progressed or who are intolerant to crizotinib based on a blinded independent review committee (BIRC)-assessed overall response rate (ORR) of 44% among 163 patients in a single-arm trial.”

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In Bold Move, FDA Approves Cancer Drug For Any Advanced Tumor With Genetic Changes

Excerpt:

“For the first time, the FDA has approved a drug for use in cancer—of any type—that harbors certain molecular features. Merck’s Keytruda, an immune oncology drug, may be prescribed for any resistant, metastatic tumor with microsatellite instability (MSI) or other evidence for defective DNA mismatch repair.

“This is good news for patients. Previously, Keytruda (pembrolizumab) was approved by the FDA for use in some forms of lung cancer, melanoma, head and neck cancer, and Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Now, patients can try this medication if they have advanced cancer of any form with pathological MSI or DNA mismatch repair defects. Microsatellite instability most often appears in colon cancers, affecting around 15% of cases. Variants of DNA mismatch repair genes are implicated in heritable cancer dispositions such as Lynch syndrome.”

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FDA Panel Backs Novel Anti-HER2 Drug for Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Another potential drug for HER2-positive breast cancer received strong numeric support from an FDA advisory committee, tempered by reservations about a broad indication, modest clinical benefit, and toxicity issues.

“By a 12-4 vote, the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee (ODAC) supported FDA approval of the dual HER2/EGFR inhibitor neratinib for early HER2-positive breast cancer that relapses after trastuzumab (Herceptin) maintenance therapy.”

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FDA Approves Combining Merck’s Keytruda With Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer Patients

Excerpt:

“U.S. health regulators approved expanding the use of Merck & Co.’s cancer drug Keytruda to include adding it to chemotherapy to treat lung cancer, broadening the drug’s potential market though evidence for the combination’s benefit is mixed.

“Keytruda, introduced in 2014, is one of a new wave of cancer drugs designed to work by harnessing the body’s own immune system to fight tumors. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved combining it with two chemotherapy agents, pemetrexed and carboplatin, to treat patients with an advanced form of lung cancer. Eli Lilly & Co. markets pemetrexed under the brand Alimta, and carboplatin is available generically.”

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FDA Approves Co-Packaging of Ribociclib With Letrozole for Metastatic Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“The FDA has approved co-packaging of the oral medications ribociclib (Kisqali) and letrozole (Femara) for the treatment of postmenopausal women with HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer.

“With the new Kisqali Femara Co-Pack, patients can obtain a full 28-day cycle of the 2 medicines in 1 package with 1 prescription and 1 copay, and the cost will be the same as that for Kisqali alone, according to Novartis, which manufactures both medications.”

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FDA Grants Fast Track Designation to Reolysin for Metastatic Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“The FDA granted fast track designation to pelareorep for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, according to the drug’s manufacturer.

“Pelareorep (Reolysin, Oncolytics Biotech) is an immuno-oncology viral-agent designed to induce selective tumor lysis, and promote an inflamed tumor phenotype through innate and adaptive immune responses, according to a company-issued press release.

“An open-label, randomized phase 2 study evaluated the addition of IV pelareorep to paclitaxel for patients with advanced or metastatic breast cancer.”

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FDA Approves Alunbrig (brigatinib) for Rare Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“On Friday evening, Takeda Pharmaceuticals announced the FDA has approved Alunbrig (brigatinib) to treat patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive (ALK+) metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have progressed on or are intolerant to crizotinib.

“Brigatinib is a kinase inhibitor that can be taken orally. The recommended dose is 90 mg orally once daily for the first 7 days. If 90 mg is tolerated during the first 7 days, patient should increase the dose to 180 mg orally once daily. The pill can be taken with or without food.”

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FDA Grants Lorlatinib Breakthrough Designation for NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The FDA has granted a breakthrough therapy designation to lorlatinib for use in patients with ALK-positive metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have previously received 1 or more ALK inhibitors, according to Pfizer, the company developing the next-generation ALK/ROS1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI).

” ‘This regulatory designation recognizes the potential for lorlatinib to provide an important treatment option for patients with ALK-positive NSCLC whose cancers have progressed despite treatment,’ Mace Rothenberg, MD, chief development officer, Oncology, Pfizer Global Product Development, said in a release. ‘Pfizer’s rapid development of lorlatinib reflects a commitment to developing biomarker-driven therapies to meet the evolving needs of patients.’ ”

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