Marty Tenenbaum to Speak at Bridging Clinical Research & Clinical Health Care Collaborative

Cancer Commons founder Marty Tenenbaum, PhD, will speak at the upcoming Bridging Clinical Research & Clinical Health Care Collaborative at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, on March 4 at 5:00 pm. Marty, who founded Cancer Commons after his own battle with melanoma, will facilitate an expert panel discussion on “Reinventing Clinical Research and Cancer Care.” That same day, he will also lead a lunchtime discussion on “Shifting the Clinical Trials Paradigm From Approving Drugs to Curing Patients.”

In preparation for the conference, Marty has written a piece for Bridging Clinical that outlines his take on the increasing demand for patients in clinical research. An excerpt: “Those familiar with the current drug development process express skepticism that the system can ever be changed — and for good reason; many have tried and failed. However, a confluence of trends, from patient activism to the explosion of new therapies to an unprecedented open regulatory environment, make a paradigm shift from drug-developer-centric to patient-centric trials both necessary and possible.” Click here to read the full article.

Learn more about this event at https://www.bridgingclinical.com/.


Cancer Commons Leadership to Speak at Precision Medicine World Conference—Patients Welcome!

Cancer Commons leadership, including founder Marty Tenenbaum, executive director Erika Vial Monteverdi, and editor in chief George Lundberg, are speaking at the 2019 Precision Medicine World Conference (PMWC) in Silicon Valley. Every year, the conference attracts doctors, innovators, and patients “to learn first-hand about the latest developments and advancements in precision medicine and cutting-edge new strategies and solutions that are changing how patients are treated.”

On January 22 at 8:45 am, Marty will lead a panel discussing the potential of real-world evidence to inform research and clinical decision making: “Traditionally, the majority of evidence regarding the benefits and risks of cancer treatments is derived from clinical trial populations. However, the vast majority of cancer patients receive treatment outside the context of clinical trials. There is tremendous motivation to evaluate the benefits and risks of cancer treatments delivered in the context of ‘real world’ care. Real-world evidence (RWE) is typically defined as treatment that is not delivered in accordance with an investigational protocol and therefore lacks clearly specified endpoints and assessment intervals for determining benefit. This session will cover opportunities and challenges in using real-world evidence to inform clinical decision making in cancer. The session will review opportunities and challenges in defining real world endpoints and the development of methods and analytical tools capable of generating insights from RWE.” Continue reading…