No Link Found between Vitamin D Level and Fatal Prostate Cancer

“Neither circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels nor common variations in vitamin D pathway genes appear to be associated with risk of fatal prostate cancer, according to research published online March 2 in Cancer.

“Irene M. Shui, Sc.D., of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues identified 518 fatal cases of prostate cancer, and 2,986 controls, with 25(OH)D data in a large cohort consortium. Vitamin D-related genetic information was available for 496 fatal cases and 3,577 controls. The associations of circulating 25(OH)D and common variations in key vitamin D-related genes with fatal prostate cancer were assessed…

” ‘Statistically significant associations were not observed for either 25(OH)D or vitamin D-related SNPs with fatal prostate cancer,’ the authors write. ‘The effect modification of 25(OH)D associations by biologically plausible genetic variation may deserve further exploration.’ “


Vitamin D Deficiency Worsens Outcomes With B-Cell Lymphoma

“Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) contributes to worse outcomes in elderly patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with rituximab, according to a study published online Aug. 18 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“Jörg Thomas Bittenbring, MD, from Universitätsklinikum des Saarlandes in Germany, and colleagues examined the impact and mechanisms of VDD in patients with DLBCL. Chemoluminescent immunoassays were used to evaluate 359 pretreatment 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 serum levels from the RICOVER-60 study (6 Versus 8 Cycles of Biweekly CHOP-14 With or Without Rituximab) and 63 from the RICOVER-noRTh study (an amendment to the RICOVER-60 study).

“The researchers found that RICOVER-60 patients treated with rituximab with VDD (≤8 ng/mL) had 3-year event-free survival (EFS) of 59% and 3-year overall survival (OS) of 70%, while those with vitamin D levels >8 ng/mL treated with rituximab had EFS and OS of 79 and 82%, respectively. In multivariate analysis adjusting for International Prognostic Index risk factors, these differences remained significant, with hazard ratios of 2.1 (P = 0.008) for EFS and 1.9 (P = 0.040) for OS. In all 7 individuals with VDD, there were significant increases in rituximab-mediated cellular cytotoxicity (RMCC; P < 0.001) after substitution and normalization of their vitamin D levels.”


Higher Plasma Vitamin D Concentration Associated With Reduced Cancer-Specific and All-Cause Mortality After Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer

The gist: A study with volunteer patients found that people being treated for colorectal cancer have better survival rates if they have high levels of vitamin D in their blood. It cannot yet be said whether taking vitamin D supplements reduces the risk of death for people with colorectal cancer, but further studies may explore this possibility.

“In a Scottish study reported in Journal of Clinical Oncology, Zgaga et al found strong associations between plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) after a diagnosis of colorectal cancer and colorectal cancer–specific and all-cause mortality. Significant interactions of vitamin D receptor genotype/haplotype and 25-OHD levels were also observed for colorectal cancer–specific and all-cause mortality…

“The study involved 1,598 Scottish patients with stage I to III colorectal cancer. Blood samples for 25-OHD measurement were taken postoperatively. At the time of sampling, 49.7% of patients had vitamin D deficiency (25-OHD < 10 ng/mL) and 26.8% were at high risk of deficiency (10–16 ng/mL). Multivariate analysis used May-adjusted 25-OHD levels and adjusted for tumor site, surgery, time between definitive treatment and sampling, season of blood collection, body mass index, and level of physical activity…

“The investigators concluded, ‘In patients with stage I to III [colorectal cancer], postoperative plasma vitamin D is associated with clinically important differences in survival outcome, higher levels being associated with better outcome. We observed interactions between 25-OHD level and [vitamin D receptor] genotype, suggesting a causal relationship between vitamin D and survival. The influence of vitamin D supplementation on [colorectal cancer] outcome will require further investigation.’ ”


Sunshine Vitamin Ups Bowel Cancer Survival Odds, Study Finds

“Bowel cancer patients with high levels of vitamin D in their blood are more likely to survive the disease, a study shows.

“Patients with the highest levels of vitamin D have half the risk of dying compared with those with the lowest levels, the findings reveal.

“The study is the first to correlate total blood levels of vitamin D in bowel cancer patients after their diagnosis – which includes that produced after exposure to sunlight and that obtained from dietary sources – with their long term survival prospects.”


Vitamin D Blog: Do Low Levels Raise Cancer Death Rates?

“Low levels of vitamin D were associated with higher cancer mortality in people with a history of cancer, a study found.

“Based on a meta-analysis, low 25(OH) vitamin D levels were tied to a risk ratio of 1.70 (95% CI 1.00-2.88) in cancer patients with a disease history. Inadequate vitamin D levels also were linked to an increase in all-cause mortality (RR 1.57, 95% CI 1.36-1.81) and cardiovascular mortality (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.18-1.68), reported Ben Schöttker, PhD, of the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, and colleagues in BMJ.”


Vitamin D Blog: Do Low Levels Raise Cancer Death Rates?

“Low levels of vitamin D were associated with higher cancer mortality in people with a history of cancer, a study found.

“Based on a meta-analysis, low 25(OH) vitamin D levels were tied to a risk ratio of 1.70 (95% CI 1.00-2.88) in cancer patients with a disease history. Inadequate vitamin D levels also were linked to an increase in all-cause mortality (RR 1.57, 95% CI 1.36-1.81) and cardiovascular mortality (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.18-1.68), reported Ben Schöttker, PhD, of the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, and colleagues in BMJ.”


Vitamin D Blog: Do Low Levels Raise Cancer Death Rates?

“Low levels of vitamin D were associated with higher cancer mortality in people with a history of cancer, a study found.

“Based on a meta-analysis, low 25(OH) vitamin D levels were tied to a risk ratio of 1.70 (95% CI 1.00-2.88) in cancer patients with a disease history. Inadequate vitamin D levels also were linked to an increase in all-cause mortality (RR 1.57, 95% CI 1.36-1.81) and cardiovascular mortality (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.18-1.68), reported Ben Schöttker, PhD, of the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, and colleagues in BMJ.”